DIGITAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

DEVELOPING FEEDBACK LITERACY AND EVALUATIVE JUDGEMENT USING SELF AND PEER ASSESSMENT

There are many learning activities which develop student skills and build their knowledge by involving them in processes of self assessment of these two things and reflection on the results of such a self review. Activities that involve learners in assessing the skills, performances on tasks and outputs of others are also valuable to reflect on.

Self assessment involves students in understanding criteria to apply to their own work and determining the extent to which they have met these criteria. Peer assessment includes the process in which students assess the achievements, learning outcomes, and performances of their peers. (Abassian, et al, 2017: 6).

WHY WOULD I USE SELF AND PEER ASSESSMENT?

Self and peer assessment  is critical to the development of evaluative judgement (Tai et al, 2018). Evaluative judgement is particularly dependent on authentic tasks and activities that ask learners to review and/or assess their own work and the work of others, against a set of standards or criteria. When students are guided to successfully reconcile feedback from different sources (such as their teachers, their peers, a workplace supervisor or a mentor) that provides powerful learning. Apart from that valuable outcome, self and peer assessment can also support other highly desirable and closely related aims:

  • Encourages independent and ‘self-regulated’ learning without constant input from each (Boud, et al 1999; Nichol, 2020; Wood & Freney, 2007);
  • Develops teamwork, collaborative and communication skills (Wu,et al 2014);
  • Develops reflective and critical thinking skills (Somervell, 1993; Nichol, 2020; Wood & Freney, 2007); 
  • Is a form of authentic assessment (Boud, et al 2013) that mirrors workplace learning and practice;
  • Helps students  understand assessment criteria and rubrics (Yucel, et al 2014);
  • Encourages active learning; not always ‘to be assessed’, but as ‘assessors’ (Brindley & Scoffield, 1998);

To see how these outcomes can be connected to progressive mastery of Deakin University’s Graduate Learning Outcomes (GLOs). Learn how feedback literacy can aid the progress of GLO6 and GLO7. 

 

DEVELOPING FEEDBACK LITERACY AND EVALUATIVE JUDGEMENT USING SELF AND PEER ASSESSMENT

There are many learning activities which develop student skills and build their knowledge by involving them in processes of self assessment of these two things and reflection on the results of such a self review. Activities that involve learners in assessing the skills, performances on tasks and outputs of others are also valuable to reflect on.

Self assessment involves students in understanding criteria to apply to their own work and determining the extent to which they have met these criteria. Peer assessment includes the process in which students assess the achievements, learning outcomes, and performances of their peers. (Abassian, et al, 2017: 6).

WHY WOULD I USE SELF & PEER ASSESSMENT?

Self and peer assessment  is critical to the development of evaluative judgement (Tai et al, 2018). Evaluative judgement is particularly dependent on authentic tasks and activities that ask learners to review and/or assess their own work and the work of others, against a set of standards or criteria. When students are guided to successfully reconcile feedback from different sources (such as their teachers, their peers, a workplace supervisor or a mentor) that provides powerful learning. Apart from that valuable outcome, self and peer assessment can also support other highly desirable and closely related aims:

  • Encourages independent and ‘self-regulated’ learning without constant input from each (Boud, et al 1999; Nichol, 2020; Wood & Freney, 2007);
  • Develops teamwork, collaborative and communication skills (Wu,et al 2014);
  • Develops reflective and critical thinking skills (Somervell, 1993; Nichol, 2020; Wood & Freney, 2007);
  • Is a form of authentic assessment (Boud, et al 2013) that mirrors workplace learning and practice;
  • Helps students  understand assessment criteria and rubrics (Yucel, et al 2014);
  • Encourages active learning; not always ‘to be assessed’, but as ‘assessors’ (Brindley & Scoffield, 1998);

To see how these outcomes can be connected to progressive mastery of Deakin University’s Graduate Learning Outcomes (GLOs). Learn how feedback literacy can aid the progress of GLO6 and GLO7. 

WHEN WOULD I USE SELF AND PEER ASSESSMENT?

Development of the capabilities outlined in the list above is progressive task for learners. Think about which tasks and forms of assessment you can use in first-year, to assist commencing students to start on this journey. Self review is a great place to begin. The SharePoint site, Active, engaged learning with FeedbackFruits has a collection of use cases that you can consider in thinking through the use of self and peer assessment in your teaching, the benefits of using this technology and addressing the known challenges you might face with proven strategies that you can use to navigate them.

USE CASE 1 - USING THE PEER REVIEW PLUGIN

USE CASE 2 - USING GROUP EVALUATION

An academic in the Faculty of Arts and Education had been looking for an effective technology to support peer review activities among students and was among the first to use FeedbackFruits when the pilot started in T2, 2018.

This unit situates within the School of Education where the first assessment task required students to prepare an outline for an authentic unit of work that they were either currently teaching or would be teaching in the future. Students were encouraged to participate in SPA activities to gauge and refine their knowledge of curriculum design, identify what they would do differently based on this feedback and apply peer feedback to improve their work.

The teaching team used the FeedbackFruits ‘peer review plugin’ to facilitate this SAP activity which resulted in students and teachers having a more streamlined process for self and peer feedback to flow.

Teaching teams from the Optometry course wanted to set up a group activity whereby each group member could give and receive feedback on their input and involvement in their project work. They were looking to have students reflect on peer feedback within groups which necessitated the use of the Group Evaluation Plugin of FeedbackFruits.

Beyond the pedagogical drivers behind the activity, there were design elements required to enable a smooth and positive teaching and learning experience, including:

  • The requirement for a 24-hour deadline to give each other feedback and then a week to reflect on it.
  • The need for reviewer anonymity and teacher moderation (to monitor ‘who said what’ within a group and appropriateness of peer feedback).
  • Option to choose between a likert-scale or complex rubric.
  • The ability to create groups with different numbers of students, but a maximum of 8 members each.
  • Ability to make mandatory comment/feedback area after addressing each criterion.
  • Setting release date to follow the group presentation.

A student survey conducted in T3 2018 and T1 2019 reveal that students overall positively responded to using this tool as part of their group work and the pilot will continue in T1 2020.

 

PEER REVIEW

An academic in the Faculty of Arts and Education had been looking for an effective technology to support peer review activities among students and was among the first to use FeedbackFruits when the pilot started in T2, 2018.

This unit situates within the School of Education where the first assessment task required students to prepare an outline for an authentic unit of work that they were either currently teaching or would be teaching in the future. Students were encouraged to participate in SPA activities to gauge and refine their knowledge of curriculum design, identify what they would do differently based on this feedback and apply peer feedback to improve their work.

The teaching team used FeedbackFruits’ ‘peer review plugin’ to facilitate this SAP activity which resulted in students and teachers having a more streamlined process for self and peer feedback to flow.

TEAMWORK EVALUATION

Teaching teams from the Optometry course wanted to set up a group activity whereby each group member could give and receive feedback on their input and involvement in their project work. They were looking to have students reflect on peer feedback within groups which necessitated the use of the Group Evaluation Plugin of FeedbackFruits.

Beyond the pedagogical drivers behind the activity, there were design elements required to enable a smooth and positive teaching and learning experience, including:

  • The requirement for a 24-hour deadline to give each other feedback and then a week to reflect on it.
  • The need for reviewer anonymity and teacher moderation (to monitor ‘who said what’ within a group and appropriateness of peer feedback).
  • Option to choose between a likert-scale or complex rubric.
  • The ability to create groups with different numbers of students, but a maximum of 8 members each.
  • Ability to make mandatory comment/feedback area after addressing each criterion.
  • Setting release date to follow the group presentation.

A student survey conducted in T3 2018 and T1 2019 reveal that students overall positively responded to using this tool as part of their group work and the pilot will continue in T1 2020.

HOW DO I GET STARTED WITH SELF AND PEER ASSESSMENT?

Detailed pedagogical advice is available on Active, engaged learning with FeedbackFruits which showcases the full suite of FeedbackFruits tools. Access technical overviews and guides for using these tools to support self and peer assessment resources pages by clicking the icons below.

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RESOURCES

Site References

Abbasian, G., Khezrinejad, M., and Teimourtash, M. (2017) Involving Self, Peer, and Teacher-Assessment in a Writing Course: A Cross Comparison and Reflection of Students’ Perceptions, The Journal of Applied Linguistics and Applied Literature, 5:1, 3-26.

Boud, D., Cohen, R., and Sampson, J. (1999) Peer Learning and Assessment, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 24, 413-426.

Boud, D., Dawson, P, Tai, J and Ajjawi, R. (2018) Creating an agenda for developing students’ evaluative judgement. In Boud, D, Ajjawi, R, Dawson, P and Tai, J (Eds.), Developing evaluative judgement in higher education: assessment for knowing and producing quality work (pp.186-195). London: Routledge.

Brindley, C. and Scoffield, S. (1998) Peer Assessment in Undergraduate Programmes, Teaching in Higher Education, 3:1, 79-90.

Boud, D. and Molloy, E. (2013) Rethinking models of feedback for learning: the challenge of design, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 38, 698-712.

Somervell, H. (1993) Issues in Assessment, Enterprise and Higher Education: the case for self‐peer and collaborative assessment, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 18:3, 221-233.

Yucel, R., Bird, F., Young, J. and Blanksby, T (2014) The road to self-assessment: exemplar marking before peer review develops first-year students’ capacity to judge the quality of a scientific report, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 39:8, 971-986.

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Feedbackfruits

If you are currently creating an assignment with FeedbackFruits, did you know that you can request help, or search for answers, within the tool by clicking the Help Centre button in the lower left-hand side of the screen? 

Learn how to access the Help Centre.

Technical issues

Email eSolutions: deakin@service-now.com
Phone support: 1800 463 888

Hours of support:

Monday to Friday: 8:00am – 8:00pm

Saturday to Sunday: 11:00am – 5:00pm

FEEDBACK FRUITS

If you are currently creating an assignment with FeedbackFruits, did you know that you can request help, or search for answers, within the tool by clicking the Help Centre button in the lower left-hand side of the screen? 

For more information on the Help Centre click HERE. 

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