DIGITAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

MICROSOFT TEAMS RESOURCES

Below are a range of resources that include both pedagogical considerations and technical steps on how to best utilise Microsoft Teams in your teaching practice.

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Resource 1: Designing collaborative learning using Microsoft Teams

Resource 1: Designing collaborative learning using Microsoft Teams

How does collaboration happen in Microsoft Teams?

The word collaboration conjures up different things for different people, and you and often think of a group of people coming together to solve a complex problem or generate an artefact. The following video explains how Microsoft Teams can facilitate collaborative learning.

Why does Microsoft Teams promote collaboration?

If you consider how students currently engage with collaborative learning tasks/projects, they are often left to decide what software they use and how they use it. This leads to students using multiple software for multiple purposes and can lead to systems fatigue. Microsoft Teams eliminates this as all the collaboration happens in one space; from conversation/discussion; to artefact generation; to meetings; and planning of tasks. Rather than communicating via email, you can tag people and get a direct reply in a familiar manner.

Students and academics can also personalise their space by adding tabs and apps that they want to use. Take it another step further and all of your content can be hosted within Microsoft Teams so students don’t need to go outside of Microsoft Teams.

Evidence student learning

Central to Microsoft Teams is transparency and the ability for students to evidence their contribution to a project. They can do this by sharing their contribution through conversation and artefact generation.

Through ‘Manage team > Analytics’ as a facilitator you can also see how many ‘active users’ there are; as well as when and how many messages there are.

Tips to develop collaborative learning tasks

Through interviews with academics and researching the use of Microsoft Teams in teaching and learning, the following should be considered when developing collaborative learning tasks with Microsoft Teams:

  • Develop a project that spans an appropriate amount of time across the trimester to promote active engagements;
  • Be explicit on the purpose of Microsoft Teams for staff and students;
  • Consider the set up of the Microsoft Team as it can be hard to facilitate and manage multiple teams from an academic perspective;
  • Develop tasks that are authentic to their industry context so the use of Microsoft Teams is reflective of professional practice;
  • Scaffold the collaborative learning task so there are key milestones for students to evidence;
  • Provide support resources for students such as the Good practice guide for using Microsoft Teams

 

Before You Get Started

Collaboration in Microsoft Teams – Explore how Microsoft Teams can be used as a collaboration hub in Higher Education and how it can enhance collaborative learning

Watch this overview of Microsoft Teams to review the basic, and most common features of Microsoft Teams.

Complete this Microsoft Teams interactive demo to explore the basic functionality.

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RESOURCE 2: AN OVERVIEW OF MICROSOFT TEAMS

RESOURCE 2: AN OVERVIEW OF MICROSOFT TEAMS
What are the key features of Microsoft Teams?
Getting to know the Microsoft Teams canvas

Know the basics but want to know more about the activity feed and notifications? Use this section to explore the Microsoft Teams canvas a little more.

  • Explore your activity feed – to find a summary of everything that’s happened in the Teams you are a part of will appear in this feed. Find out what all the different symbols mean.
  • Overview of notifications – the six things you need to know about managing notifications in your Teams.
  • Personalise your notifications – check your settings for your notifications and personalise your space.
  • Pin a Team or Channel – want to prioritise your workspace; use this to pin a team or channel.
  • Use the search function – can’t find an old message, or chat? Use the search function to find them.
  • Tips and tricks – six key things you need to know including tips on chat, formatting, and searching and hiding messages.
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RESOURCE 3: Collaborating with Microsoft Teams

RESOURCE 3: Getting started with Microsoft Teams

Before you get started using Microsoft Teams it is critical to know its role and purpose in the context of your unit. It is important that the collaborative learning task supports the purpose for using Microsoft Teams. If you need some inspiration, please visit When would I use Microsoft Teams?

Creating a Team
  • Type of team – before you get started you need to decide which team type you will collaborate using. It is recommended that you use Class so you can access Classroom OneNote or Other if you are not interested in using OneNote in your unit.
  • Roles and purposes  – outlines the difference between owners, members, guests.
  • Teams versus channels – common misconception of the different terminology.
  • Add members to a team – this shows you how to add members and guests to a team. Please note, if you would like to invite a ‘guest’ you can; this is a member from outside Deakin University.
  • Find or join a team – there are many different Teams already in existence that you may wish to search for and join.
  • Show or hide a team or channel – customise your workspace to reflect what you want to see.
  • Moderate roles and settings – by default, everyone can post, react and reply to non-private channels. If you want to manage this, you can determine what permissions individuals have.
Communicating in Microsoft Teams
Whether you want to send a message to a channel or create an announcement, this set of resources will walk you through it.

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RESOURCE 4: What are others doing?

RESOURCE 4: What are others doing?

Microsoft Teams is evolving in the Higher Education space as we continue to promote work integrated learning. The following examples demonstrate different ways in which Microsoft Teams is being used in Education.

USE CASE 4 – Dr David Kellerman with Microsoft Teams at UNSW

See how Dr David Kellerman from University of NSW implemented Microsoft Teams in an Engineering cohort of 5000 students with on and off campus students. He explains the purpose of choosing Microsoft Teams and the impact it has had on his teaching and students.

Watch how he has implemented Microsoft Teams.

USE CASE 5 – Esam Baboukhan using Mirosoft Teams for accessibility at the City of Westminister College

The City of Westminister College uses technology to ensure students have the necessary skills to succeed in future jobs. They implemented Microsoft Teams to make it seamless for students to collaborate on projects; to communicate with peers easier and connect with the teacher and have a conversation in real-time.

Watch eLearning Manager, Esam Baboukhan explain how Microsoft Teams has made his classroom more inclusive and enabled all of his students to connect.

USE CASE 6 – Watch Dr Timothy Ponce enhance communication at University of Texas Arlington

Dr Timothy Ponce is a Professor of English where some of his students were struggling with their coursework and didn’t reach out to him or their peers for help. Although there were multiple communication channels available, he wanted to reduce the number of tools that the students were accessing so he introduced Microsoft Teams.

Watch him explain what he did and the impact it had on his students here.

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RESOURCE 5: How do I get started?

RESOURCE 5: How do I get started?

To get started:

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RESOURCE 6: What's new with Microsoft Teams?

RESOURCE 6: What’s new with Microsoft Teams?

This will be updated with what’s new in Microsoft Teams.

WHO DO I GO TO FOR SUPPORT AND ADVICE?

Technical issues

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Phone support: 1800 463 888

Hours of support:

Monday to Friday: 8:00am – 8:00pm

Saturday to Sunday: 11:00am – 5:00pm

Design issues

Email eSolutions: deakin@service-now.com
Phone support: 1800 463 888

Hours of support:

Monday to Friday: 8:00am – 8:00pm

Saturday to Sunday: 11:00am – 5:00pm

FACULTY

Faculty of Business and Law

Faculty of SEBE

Faculty of Arts and Education

Faculty of Health

Technical issues

Email eSolutions: deakin@service-now.com
Phone support: 1800 463 888

Hours of support:

  • Monday to Friday: 8:00am – 8:00pm
  • Saturday to Sunday: 11:00am – 5:00pm

Design issues

Email eSolutions: deakin@service-now.com
Phone support: 1800 463 888

Hours of support:

  • Monday to Friday: 8:00am – 8:00pm
  • Saturday to Sunday: 11:00am – 5:00pm

FACULTY

  • Faculty of Business and Law 
  • Faculty of SEBE 
  • Faculty of Arts and Education 
  • Faculty of Health