Using Zoom for teaching just got easier

Using Zoom for teaching just got easier

Using Zoom for teaching just got easier

27

MAY, 2021

Digital Tools
Good Practice
Teaching Online

As more and more people have been using Zoom for teaching, we’ve been piloting an integration between Zoom and CloudDeakin to make it easier to schedule and join Zoom sessions, and access recordings, directly from unit sites. Following successful pilots in T3 2020 and T1 2021, we are now pleased to be able to make this integration available in all unit sites!

How does the integration work?

Teaching teams can use the integration (‘Zoom LTI’) to schedule classes or seminars for the unit in Zoom – these are linked to the Zoom account of the person who scheduled them, but appear in a list within the unit site. Zoom sessions that have already been scheduled can be imported into the unit site using the LTI. Staff and students can then join the session from the unit site. If the session is recorded to the Cloud, the recording will automatically be accessible via the unit site. If you use Zoom for teaching, we recommend that you use the Zoom LTI to create a simpler experience for you and your students.

How do I set it up?

You can set up the LTI in your unit site by clicking on ‘Existing activities’. From there, go to ‘External Learning Tools’ and select ‘Zoom’. Find out more about how to use the LTI to schedule Zoom classes.

 

What else do I need to know about using Zoom for teaching?

Your Zoom account can be used to host meetings for up to 300 participants, with breakout rooms, polling, whiteboards, chat and video- and audio-access for all participants. If you need to set up a Zoom class for between 300 and 500 students, extended licenses are available upon request to eSolutions Service Desk – these allow you to schedule meetings, with full interactivity, for up to 500 participants.

If you need to set up a Zoom class for between 500 and 1000 participants, there are a limited number of webinar licenses available. Webinars do not support breakout rooms, whiteboards or video- and audio-access for all participants so you will need to consider other platforms such as Mentimeter or Padlet to make your class interactive – check out the Guide for Teaching Large Classes Online for ideas. Webinars cannot be scheduled through the LTI – contact your faculty Digital Learning / CloudDeakin support team if a webinar is required.

If you intend to use Zoom from within an on-campus classroom, please contact Timetabling to ensure that the allocated teaching space is equipped with Zoom functionality.

 

Managing Zoom recordings

Zoom has limited storage capacity so if you record your Zoom class and intend to use or keep that recording in subsequent trimesters, you should transfer the recording to DeakinAir. Learn more about transferring recordings.

 

Find out more

Find out more about how to use Zoom for teaching or contact your faculty Digital Learning / CloudDeakin support team.

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Making learning accessible for everyone

Making learning accessible for everyone

Making learning accessible for everyone

27

MAY, 2021

Good Practice
Inclusive Education
Teaching and Learning

This week we launched the Accessibility Champions Project, which is an initiative to develop a passionate community of accessibility specialists from across the University to become leaders in this space. This project is led by Danni McCarthy from the Teaching Capabilities Team, in Deakin Learning Futures. Funded by the Higher Education Participation Partnership Program, the project is focused on optimising access and success for diverse learners. One way this can be achieved is through the development of a unified and consistent approach to accessibility in our online teaching and learning environments. The project has been designed to include a variety of participants, with representatives coming to the project from the faculties of Health, Science, Business and Law, Arts and Education, and Deakin Learning Futures. 

Like our physical learning environments, we have standards for our online teaching and learning environments. This project was developed in response to the impact of Covid and the subsequent unprecedented migration to deliver education online. As a result, it has also revealed a growing inequality of access to information for students with a disability in our online learning environments. Therefore, the goal of this project is to generate a genuine commitment and enthusiasm for the implementation of inclusivity and accessibility practices in a clear and targeted way.

We have selected nine Accessibility Champions who represent a diversity of professional backgrounds. A core part of this project will be the professional development that each participant will engage with through Vision Australia or The Centre for Inclusive Design. The goal is to develop a consistent and sustainable approach to accessibility that is appropriate to our context and needs within Deakin University. 

This project seeks to develop a knowledge-sharing community of accessibility experts. To achieve this, the champions will work to develop their capabilities in mentorship, training, and modelling best practice accessibility standards in a sustainable way that will support teaching and learning staff. As they build this critical knowledge and expertise, they will be seeking out partnerships, developing learning assets, mentoring others, and facilitating training sessions.

In the coming weeks the champions will begin their training during the incubation phase of this project. Once this phase is complete, the champions will begin to reach out to develop partnerships with other areas of the Deakin community and beyond. We are just at the beginning of the project and given the talented and passionate individuals who will put their shoulders to the wheel, there is no doubt that this project will achieve great things. 

Contact Danni McCarthy, Lecturer, Inclusive Education to register your interest in working with an Accessibility Champion.

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Inquiry-Based Learning with Microsoft Office 365 Tools

Inquiry-Based Learning with Microsoft Office 365 Tools

Inquiry-Based Learning with Microsoft Office 365 Tools

27

MAY, 2021

Digital Tools
Good Practice

Although we are born with an innate curiosity that drives us to explore our world, this seems to wane or become dormant as we mature. Some, like Socrates, have blamed our declining curiosity on ‘hubris’ or people’s egos, whereas Albert Einstein perceived the education system as the culprit, suggesting it was strangled the ‘holy curiosity of inquiry’. While the root causes are unclear, research reveals instructional approaches, in particular inquiry-based learning, can be used to stimulate and harness our learners’ curiosity to drive deep learning.

During the month of April, Dr Isma Seetal from the Deakin Learning Innovation team, Vivek Venkiteswaran from the Business and Law pod and Dr Tara Draper from the SEBE teaching team organised a series of workshops to discuss how inquiry-based learning and Microsoft Office 365 tools can be used to enhance student learning. In this article, we share some key takeaways from our workshop and launch some resources that we have created and curated to support you in using Microsoft Office 365 tools in teaching and learning.

 

Inquiry-based Learning

We have conceptualised inquiry-based learning broadly as a constructivist approach that consists of a range of pedagogical strategies where the overall goal is for students to solve a problem and perform investigative work. Inquiry-based learning can take various forms including research activities such as constructing literature reviews and enactments of practice, which involve students playing roles that are deemed crucial in the profession they aspire to join.

Compared to unassisted discovery and traditional approaches such as direct instruction, inquiry-based learning has a greater impact on student learning. It also supports the development of a range of skills such as deep thinking, knowledge application and logical reasoning.  Beyond the educational benefits it brings, inquiry-based learning also sustains students’ interest and motivation. However, there is a need for useful instructor guidance during the inquiry task and social support from peers for students to reap the benefits that inquiry-based learning offers.

 

Tools for Inquiry-based Learning

Microsoft Office 365 tools affords a myriad of features that can be leveraged to facilitate, support or enhance various learning activities in inquiry-based learning. Microsoft Forms, the online survey creator, can be used by instructors to gauge learners’ prior knowledge, engage them in self- and peer-review activities and promote reflection at various points during inquiry processes. Microsoft OneNote, the digital note-taking app, can be used by learners for their research activities such as research collation, synthesis and collaborative creation of research reports and papers. Other types of artefacts such as newsletters and presentations can be produced using Microsoft Sway, which can additionally be leveraged to add interactive elements to various types of instructional resources.

 

Resources for Deakin staff

You can learn more about how these Microsoft Office 365 tools can be used for inquiry-based learning and other learning activities through our resources, which are currently hosted on our Microsoft OneNote, Microsoft Forms and Microsoft Sway SharePoint pages. You can join also the demystifying digital community of practice to learn about and share digital tips with colleagues. You can also join the Demystifying Digital Community on Yammer.

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Teaching Capability Framework

Teaching Capability Framework

Teaching Capability Framework

8

APRIL, 2021

Teaching and Learning
Professional learning

Enhancing the capabilities of teaching teams is one of the most important ways universities can ensure high-quality student experiences. Deakin University has developed a unique Teaching Capability Framework that includes a range of both academic and professional roles that contribute to teaching and learning in higher education. Deakin adopts a team teaching approach and the development of learning experiences is collaborative and multidisciplinary. Recognising this, the framework is organised into four professional domains that recognises a diversity of roles.

  • Design learning opportunities
  • Deliver teaching interactions
  • Enable student learning experiences
  • Lead teaching teams

For each of these domains, the framework articulates the central capacities that are important for teaching and learning staff: Areas of Activity, Core Knowledge and Professional Values. By mapping their development against these central capacities staff can use the framework for professional learning, support for career advancement and award submissions or recognition through the Deakin HE Fellowship program.

While most university capability frameworks focus on academic roles, Deakin understands that it’s not just academics and learning developers that contribute to teaching and learning. The Deakin Teaching Capability Framework recognises that everyone from UX Specialists and librarians to WIL supervisors, career staff and technical support staff have a role to play.

‘Helping our staff to develop their teaching capabilities will help out students,’ says Prof. Helen Partridge, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Teaching and Learning. ‘This simple yet powerful idea is at the heart of the Deakin Teaching Capability Framework. Importantly, the Framework was developed to recognise and support all Deakin staff whose role contributes to teaching and learning.’

Development of the frameworkThe Deakin Teaching Capability Framework was developed by teaching and learning teams across the University. The typical activities, knowledge and values in each domain were based on the internationally recognised Professional Standards Framework (PSF). Building on this, Deakin’s Curriculum Framework and Premium Principles for Learning and Teaching were incorporated into the framework. The result is a comprehensive framework that articulates the capacities demonstrated by professional teaching teams, contextualised to Deakin University. 

For academic staff, the areas of activity in the framework are aligned with learning and teaching tasks in Deakin’s Minimum Standards for Academic Levels. The level of autonomy, complexity and influence with which these activities are undertaken increase as staff move up through the academic levels (A-E).

Using the frameworkAnyone who is in a role that contributes to the development of teaching and learning at Deakin can use the Teaching Capability Framework. Individuals can develop knowledge around the central capacities and identify areas for further development. Leaders in teaching and learning can use the framework initiate conversations at a faculty, course and University level and develop professional learning activities to build capacity of staff.

Beyond mapping and building capability, the framework can also support applications for recognition, promotion and awards. Any Deakin staff whose role contributes to teaching and learning can apply for the Deakin HE Fellowship program. This accredited and internationally recognised peer reviewed, professional recognition program supports staff in gaining recognition through HEA Fellowships.

Deakin University is proud to be a leader in the development of teaching and learning experiences by collaborative and multidisciplinary teams.

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