DeakinHE Fellowships celebrate a year of accreditation

DeakinHE Fellowships celebrate a year of accreditation

DeakinHE Fellowships celebrate a year of accreditation

27

MAY, 2021

DeakinHE Fellowships
Recognition and awards

DeakinHE Fellowship provides those involved in learning and teaching at Deakin with formal recognition of practice, impact and leadership. The DeakinHE Fellowship program provides teaching teams across the University with opportunities to apply for various categories of fellowship as they move through their teaching journey. This program is integrated into the new Deakin Teaching Capability Framework, that recognises a range of both academic and professional roles that contribute to teaching and learning at Deakin.

Professor Iain Martin, Vice-Chancellor recently hosted an afternoon tea to celebrate the successful completion of Deakin’s first year of accreditation by Advance HEA. Professor Martin congratulated newest group of 54 DeakinHE Fellowship recipients, and acknowledged the 117 Deakin staff who have been recognised as DeakinHE Fellows to date.

New Associate Fellow Dr Emma Hayes was invited to talk about her experience in the program, read the full speech to find out how Dr Hayes used the opportunity to reflect on her own teaching practice.

Thanks also went to Professor Liz Johnson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Education and Professor Helen Partridge, Pro Vice_Chancellor Teaching and Learning for supporting the accredited program, and to Associate Professor Barbie Panther and her team for managing the program pathways.

The Vice Chancellor also acknowledged the mentors and assessors from the fellowship community who supported these individuals throughout the program, and made a particular mention to sessional staff who made up a third of successful applicants.

The program for Fellows and Senior Fellows 2021 has now commenced, if you are an aspiring Associate Fellow, please register to participate in the program commencing in July.

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Dr Emma Hayes receives 2021 DeakinHE Fellowship

Dr Emma Hayes receives 2021 DeakinHE Fellowship

Dr Emma Hayes receives 2021 DeakinHE Fellowship

27

MAY, 2021

Recognition and awards
DeakinHE Fellowships

DeakinHE Fellowship provides those involved in learning and teaching at Deakin with formal recognition of practice, impact and leadership. This program is integrated into the new Deakin Teaching Capability Framework, that recognises a range of both academic and professional roles that contribute to teaching and learning at Deakin.

Professor Iain Martin, Vice-Chancellor recently hosted an afternoon tea to congratulate the newest group of 54 DeakinHE Fellowship recipients. Dr Emma Hayes was invited to talk about her experience in the program as a new Associate Fellow, and her speech is shared here in full.

‘I took part in the DeakinHE Fellowship program to further develop my teaching skills after working as a sessional at Deakin for seven years. I thought applying for Associate Fellowship would be a valuable opportunity to critically reflect on my teaching practices, and to gain new skills in communicating content to students. I thought it would also be a good opportunity to reflect during a challenging teaching year.

‘My experience of teaching a large number of level one students during COVID-19 highlighted that tutors can never rest on their existing knowledge and experiences, but need to continue to learn and adapt to changing circumstances. Through completing the Associate Fellowship I hoped to gain insight into designing learning activities that had the ability to cement students’ foundational knowledge, rather than quickly extending key concepts.

‘Reading and responding to the Professional Standards Framework (Areas of activity, core knowledge, professional values) and detailing my teaching and learning activities allowed me to take a step back from being in a classroom (or on Cloud) and think about how I design learning activities and teach.

‘I felt very supported throughout the program, and the opportunity to speak to Dr Julia Savage as I prepared my draft application was extremely valuable. My consultation with Dr Savage enabled me to reflect on how my participation in Faculty-based professional development programs formed part of my overall learning experience as a tutor. I had previously thought of these as separate learning experiences, but speaking with Dr Savage helped me see how these programs contributed to the “narrative” of my teaching experience.

‘The feedback and support that I received from my mentor, Assoc. Prof. Barbie Panther, was extremely valuable in helping me to establish a language with which to discuss my teaching methods. For example, Assoc. Prof. Panther helped me realise that learning activities I had designed for a Children’s Literature unit to assist students in understanding visual narration were actually employing Vygotsky’s scaffolding model. Assoc. Prof. Panther’s feedback really helped me see the teaching practices and qualities that I value as a tutor.

‘The support that I received from my Referee, Dr Paul Venzo, was invaluable throughout my application process, and I was humbled by the kind words Dr Venzo shared in support of my application.

‘I had applied for Fellowship to gain skills in teaching. Not only did I gain further skills in designing learning activities and teaching, but I left feeling more confident in those I had. Taking part in the Associate Fellowship program enabled me to see my skills.

I found taking part in the Fellowship program to be particularly valuable as a sessional tutor, because it enabled me to feel part of the Deakin teaching community.’

If you are an aspiring Associate Fellow, please register to participate in the program commencing in July.

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AAUT 2020 – The Professional Literacy Suite

AAUT 2020 – The Professional Literacy Suite

2020 AAUT– The Professional Literacy Suite

16

MARCH, 2021

AAUT
Rewards and Recognition

Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri

Pictured left to right: Assoc. Prof. Kerrie Bridson, Ms Simone Tyrell, Dr Leanne Ngo, Assoc. Prof. Michael Volkov, Ms Sharon Chua, Ms Kim Phu and Dr Micaela Spiers

Ms Simone Tyrell, Assoc. Prof. Kerrie Bridson, Dr Leanne Ngo, Ms Kim Phu, Ms Sharon Chua, Dr Micaela Spiers and Assoc. Prof. Michael Volkov received a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning for the development of program wide resources which support business students’ professional literacies.

The Professional Literacy Suite is an innovative and unique suite of digital learning resources scaffolded across a course within a business school context to support and motivate students to develop their professional literacy skills over their journey to graduation.

We spoke to Simone Tyrell and Dr Micaela Spiers about their citation.

How does it feel to have your work recognised by the AAUT?

Simone: It’s been a little surreal! It’s great for our work to be recognized nationally. It really validates what we’ve been doing. We thought the project was working, and we’d seen this in the students results, and it’s nice to be externally validated as well.

Micaela: It’s been a lot of work over a lot of years, particularly for Simone, and there were a lot of challenges. To have that recognized, the amount of hard work that has been put into this project – it’s a great achievement.

Tell us about your submission – what’s it all about?

Simone: With the Professional Literacy Suite, we’re scaffolding digital literacy across three degrees. We’re supporting the development of Digital literacy skills for Global Learning Outcome 3 (GLO3) and scaffolding employability across the students journey across their degree. We started with the Bachelor of Commerce and then expanded to include the Bachelor of Business and the Bachelor of Property and Real Estate. The goal is to scaffold across all the undergraduate degrees in the Deakin Business School.

The Professional Literacy Suite is a cross campus, cross unit, cross team collaboration that’s worked really well. I’m with the Library, and I’ve worked on the suite with other library team members, the Associate Dean, Teaching and learning, faculty academics, course directors and the BL Learning Innovations team. It was a really broad group of people, and the key to our success was our collaborative approach.

Micaela: The success of the Professional Literacy Suite is that we now have these modules that we can keep using, and we can keep updating, and we can put them in different units, and they can work across degrees. They add a lot of value to students and I think it’s a really great example of thinking outside the box. We had a problem, we came up with a way to address that problem and created a really good outcome for students.

What was the impact that your nominated work had on students?

Simone: We do a pre- and a post-self-assessment of the students, where they self-assess their confidence in their own digital literacy skills. When they finish, even the more confident students are rating their digital literacy skills much higher. We see a 30% boost in confidence levels as they go through. We’ve also had a lot of qualitative feedback as well, saying the student’s skills have increased and they’ve learned a lot.

Micaela: When we first introduced the digital literacy module, it was into a large core unit in the Bachelor of Commerce. That trimester we noticed a big difference in students output, in terms of the quality of their assignments compared to the trimester before, because of having done the module. Their ability to research and find information and use that information really improved.

Simone: The Inclusive curriculum and capacity building (ICCB) site did a study that was part of a HEPPP funded project and they found a 10% increase in grades for low SES students post implementation of the first digital literacy module, which was in a large marketing unit.

What value did you get out of the submission process for AAUT?

Simone: It’s a reflective process, because it makes you gather everything that you’ve done, all the information and all the data. It also makes you think about the journey along the way.

What was it like working with our Deakin mentors (previous AAUT winners) in developing your submission?

Simone: Our mentor was great. She gave us lots of feedback and was really supportive. It was nice to have a mentor that’s been through the same process before, so they know how to write a submission like this and give a lot of help along the way.

Micaela: I think when you’ve been working on a piece of work very closely, then you don’t necessarily see the gaps in the submission.  What a mentor does, in particular someone who doesn’t know the program of work very well, they can say, ‘well, what do you mean by this?’ or, ‘you’re saying this, but you haven’t evidenced that.’  That perspective is very helpful.

What advice do you have for Deakin colleagues who might be thinking about nominating for AAUT in 2021?

Simone: Get every bit of data, every bit of writing and every bit of evidence that you’ve got on your project. Give yourself plenty of time because the submission is a big piece of work. Use your mentor, pick their brains, and get other people to read it as well. Get as many people as you can to read it to make sure it makes sense. It’s worth doing if your work is something that you believe in and you’ve got the data to back it up.

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2020 AAUT – Meet Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri

2020 AAUT – Meet Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri

2020 AAUT– Meet Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri

11

MARCH, 2021

AAUT
Rewards and Recognition

Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri

Pictured left to right: Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri and Dr Craig Parker

At the 2020 Australian Awards for University Teaching (AAUT), Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri received a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning for their sustained and coherent suite of innovations to support international students in developing environmental and social responsibility and employability skills in the Master of Information Systems program.

We spoke to Craig and Harsh about their citation.

How does it feel to have your work recognised by the AAUT?

Craig: Personally, it’s been wonderful to get national recognition for our work. It was great to see feedback in the award notification letter saying how good not only our work was, but also the quality of the application. It’s just nice to know that our work is valued on a national level, not just important to us within our department.

Harsh: Craig and I have been working together since 2015 and what’s remarkable about Craig’s work is that he has a very honest engagement with the real challenges that students are experiencing. He actually engages with the lived realities of students, he doesn’t sit on a high moral ground and judge students. He sets very high academic standards, but at the same time he also provides empathetic scaffolded guidance throughout. So, to have that recognized is fantastic.

Tell us about your citation.

Craig: International students face real challenges around employment, a lot more challenges than domestic students when it comes to getting a job here in Australia. These issues relate to things like not having Australian work experience, as well as building the confidence needed to promote themselves to employers. Opportunities to work with industry are usually only offered in courses during capstone units or internship electives. I thought, how can I give students that real experience outside of those traditional opportunities?

Over the last five years I have been refining an approach where International students connect with real businesses to do their coursework assignment. An example is an assignment we do with industry around sustainability.

Harsh: Environmental and social responsibility is something that all business schools talk about for accreditation purposes. Students often feel that even if they learn about all these environmental and socially responsible behaviours, industry will be more focused on promoting profits. Craig has integrated the assignment with the industry. He asks students to go and source a problem from a real business owner and evaluate a potential sustainability solution in a large coursework unit. Students also develop important employability skills while doing this assignment.

Craig: The approach has presented a lot of challenges, such as how do you make sure that the assignment is different each year? Especially when you have little control over what businesses they’ll connect with or what sort of problems those businesses might have. That’s where the scaffolding aspect becomes really important. International students much prefer specific guidance to help them through that process. So, we created a report format that clearly indicated what sort of information they had to put into the report, and therefore what sort of things they had to find out from the business owner. There was scaffolding in terms of how to even approach businesses, how to get business owners interested in sharing information about their businesses with students for this assignment, and then how to interview them about their issues.

What was the impact on the students?

Harsh: So, it’s not just teaching students about sustainability issues or environmental issues in an abstract way, it’s about helping students build employment skills. I was recently in a carbon literacy training session, and in the UK and lots of other places they’ve actually started including carbon literacy in position descriptions. This is giving our students a competitive edge and showing them how they can walk the walk and not just talk the talk. We also redesigned the assessment so that students were required to actively seek, interpret, evaluate and act upon real life feedback from industry, their peers and their teacher to improve their solutions. Students in this program reflect upon employment skills in the introductory unit of this program and then build on this in multiple units through the program. They also engage with reflections from alumni who have successfully secured professional employment in Australia.

Craig: Often students initially feel that the process is too challenging, but as the trimester progresses, they discover that they can handle the assignment because they have the support. Students have submitted the report and given feedback about how it was a real challenge, but it was also a great eye-opening experience for them on how to seek employment.

What was it like working with our Deakin mentors (previous AAUT winners) in developing your submission?

Craig: Our mentor was just an absolute gem, and was instrumental in helping us to focus the application. The mentor’s initial advice was to identify three or four key strategies. Our mentor really got us to reflect on our core strategies and our core message that would run through the whole application. The advice was based on the mentor’s own experience, which made it even more compelling.

What advice do you have for Deakin colleagues who might be thinking about nominating for AAUT in 2021?

Craig: It’s worthwhile considering because it allows you to learn that there are things you’re doing that are really innovative and worth celebrating. There are also other things that can come out of the application process. For instance, we’re using a lot of the evidence we gathered for our application to write a journal paper. There’s a lot of benefit you can get from this sort of reflective process.

Harsh: If you think you’re doing some good stuff and your students are really benefiting from the work, I would strongly encourage you first to go and talk to your colleagues in the DLF faculty pods and draw upon them as critical friends to build your narrative. A strong message I would like to say to people is – you’re not alone. The second thing is, if you’re not successful with your application, it doesn’t mean that you’re not doing good work, it might mean that you just need to sharpen your narrative. There’s a lot of support within the University, within Deakin Learning Futures, with past successful recipients of awards and they’ll all support you and they’ll be with you in this journey. We are particularly grateful to Barbie Panther and Tony Joel for being our mentors through this process.

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2020 AAUT– Meet Deakin’s Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree team

2020 AAUT– Meet Deakin’s Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree team

04

MARCH, 2021

AAUT
Rewards and Recognition

Assoc. Prof. John White, Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston

Pictured left to right: Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke, Assoc. Prof. John White and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston

Assoc. Prof. John White, Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston recently won an Award for Programs that Enhance Learning at the 2020 Australian Awards for University Teaching (AAUT). The award recognised their work on Deakin’s Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree, which provides students with the opportunity to take part in immersive international experiences and develop skills, experience and attitudes to become highly employable conservation practitioners, ready to tackle the global environmental challenges facing society today and into the future.

We spoke to Assoc. Prof. John White about the AAUT award, Deakin’s Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree and the process of applying.

How does it feel to have your work recognised by the AAUT?

We’re all delighted. It does confirm to us what we’re doing something pretty special. It’s great to have our work recognised nationally.

Tell us about the Deakin’s Wildlife and Conservation biology degree.

Our submission was around the idea of creating globally competent and globally prepared wildlife and conservation biology graduates. Over the last 12 years, we’ve developed a process to prepare graduates, so they have the field skills and the theoretical skills of their area, but are also skilled in intercultural communication, with a much broader depth of understanding of international issues.

In the past, our students were mainly going overseas on exchange to Western countries, where they received a Western experience. We wanted our students to be working in biodiversity hotspots around the world, so we created a global engagement program.

One example is a field program study in Borneo for 16 students a year. We really immerse ourselves in the issues from both the Indigenous perspective, through to the government perspective. We live in Indigenous communities and really get a feel for the complexity of conservation issues in Borneo.

Another example a global environmental placement, where Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke and her team send out up to 100 students to locations around the world, from working in a rhino sanctuary in Uganda, through to more basic placements working in conservation in New Zealand for students with less experience.

What was the impact on students?

We’ve managed to build the number of students who actually get an international experience from what was 5% of our graduates to a point now where 79.2% of our graduates in the past 3 years have completed their degree having had an international experience, a level of internationalisation that substantially exceeds the Australian average of 21.9% (AUIDF Learning Abroad benchmarking 2019).

For me, what’s great about running the Borneo unit is that we go there with students, and so we actually get to see their skills grow. Something that becomes apparent very quickly is that students often have strongly entrenched Western viewpoints. They’ve been trained in that way of thinking and they’ve also been trained in certain solutions that work in Australia, or work in Europe, or work in North America. When you go to another place and ask students to immerse and really start to understand what’s going on, it’s very challenging at first. I don’t think students realise how entrenched their worldview is until its challenged by somebody else’s worldview.

What value did you get out of the submission process for AAUT?

Going through the application process was good for us, in a sense that it allowed us to really crystallise a little bit of the logic behind what we do and put a narrative behind it. It was a worthwhile exercise for us to really sit there and consider what we’ve been doing and the strategy behind it, taking the time to write a really clear narrative that showed how we planned the process, what’s changed and adapted.

The process was really well supported by the University. We had a mentor assigned to us who helped with the initial draft, then there was a drafting process where we got feedback. The process confirmed for us that over last 10 years of really hard work, and a lot of time away from home, we have produced something very unique.

What was it like working with our Deakin mentors in developing your submission?

Our mentor had won a team award in the past, so it was good to have somebody that had done it before, who could bring a ‘teacher’ view to the application. They had really valuable feedback as we went through the process.

What advice do you have for Deakin colleagues who might be thinking about nominating for AAUT in 2021?

If you have a good case to put forward for your work – do it. Try going through the University’s initial process of faculty teaching awards as a good way to familiarise yourself with writing these kinds of applications. Take stock of what you’re doing, and if there’s leadership behind the work and there’s a clear narrative behind what you’re doing, go for it.

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Congratulations to Deakin’s 2020 AAUT winners

Congratulations to Deakin’s 2020 AAUT winners

Congratulations to Deakin’s 2020 AAUT winners

25

FEBRUARY, 2021

Recognition and rewards
AAUT

Deakin University has been awarded one program award and two citations at the 2020 Australian Awards for University Teaching (AAUT). Established in 1997 by the Australian Government, the awards celebrate excellence in higher education and recognise learning and teaching programs or services that have a positive impact on the student experience.

‘Deakin is delighted to congratulate our three award-winning teams,’ said Professor Liz Johnson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Education. ‘It is terrific to see excellence in learning and teaching recognised nationally particularly after the intense effort from all our teaching teams during 2020 to keep our students learning and progressing in their degrees despite the disruption of the global pandemic. It is also pleasing to see success for teaching teams who demonstrate collaboration at its very best.’

The winners

Program Award

Assoc. Prof. John White, Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston received an Award for Programs that Enhance Learning for Deakin’s Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree, which provides students with the opportunity to take part in immersive international experiences and develop skills, experience and attitudes to become highly employable conservation practitioners, ready to tackle the global environmental challenges facing society today and into the future.

Citations

Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri received a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning for their work in supporting international students to develop employability skills in the Information Systems programs.

Ms Simone Tyrell, Assoc. Prof. Kerrie Bridson, Dr Leanne Ngo, Ms Kim Phu, Ms Sharon Chua, Dr Micaela Spiers and Assoc. Prof. Michael Volkov received a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning for the development of program wide resources which support business students’ professional literacies.

Learn more about the AAUT

Deakin University provides support to anyone interested in applying for an AAUT award. A range of mentors from around the University, who have previously won an AAUT award, work with applicants to produce high quality submissions. For more on the AAUT process, past winners and how to apply in the future please visit our recognition and rewards page.

Assoc. Prof. John White, Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston

Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke, Assoc. Prof. John White  and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston

Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri

Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri and Dr Craig Parker

Ms Simone Tyrell, Assoc. Prof. Kerrie Bridson, Dr Leanne Ngo, Ms Kim Phu, Ms Sharon Chua, Dr Micaela Spiers and Assoc. Prof. Michael Volkov

Assoc. Prof. Kerrie Bridson, Ms Simone Tyrell, Dr Leanne Ngo, Assoc. Prof. Michael Volkov, Ms Sharon Chua, Ms Kim Phu and Dr Micaela Spiers

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