First Nations views on tackling racism and bias in learning and teaching

First Nations views on tackling racism and bias in learning and teaching

First Nations views on tackling racism and bias in learning and teaching

30

OCTOBER, 2020

Inclusive Education
Good Practice

Banners for the Inclusive Education Community of Practice and the Office of Indigenous Strategy & Innovation

More than 100 Deakin staff came together via Zoom in October to learn effective ways to tackle racism and unconscious bias in education, with a panel of Wadawarrung regional educational leaders leading the discussion. The panel was co-hosted by the Inclusive Education Community of Practice and the Office of Indigenous Strategy and Innovation, with Prof. Mark Rose, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Indigenous Strategy & Innovation, moderating the event.

Panellists

Prof. Mark Rose (Moderator): Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous Strategy & Innovation, Deakin University

Sandra Brogden: Koorie Education Coordinator, Department of Education and Training Geelong

Ilona Sliwa: Koorie Engagement Support Officer, Department of Education and Training Geelong

Denise Charles: Koorie Engagement Support Officer, Department of Education and Training Geelong

Deb Milera: Officer Indigenous Inclusion, Deakin University

 

Panellists addressed the uncomfortable subject of whether racism exists in Australia, and in our education system, with a ‘truth-telling’ but ultimately positive approach. The statistics speak for themselves: 432 Aboriginal deaths in custody since 1991, a suicide rate twice that of non-Aboriginal Australians, and surveys showing widespread negative bias towards Aboriginal Australians. The panellists also shared moving personal stories of the long-term human impact of racism, not least by teachers in schools.

With only 2% of school teachers in Australia being Aboriginal, panellists reasoned the wider non-Aboriginal community needed to work with Aboriginal people to achieve significant change. They urged teachers to go beyond a symbolic, ‘cultural Kontiki tour’ approach to Aboriginal history and culture to educate themselves more deeply about our shared Australian history, build relationships with community members, reflect on assumptions and bias, and engage in difficult conversations to tackle racism when issues arose.

The panel emphasised the importance of taking a systemic approach to developing students’ (and teachers’) knowledge and respect for Aboriginal history and culture, including embedding this knowledge in curriculum. The panellists have been doing this work for some time in regional schools, and have shared some links to useful resources on the event page on the Inclusive Education Community of Practice website.

Prof. Rose outlined the program being undertaken by the Office of Indigenous Strategy and Innovation at Deakin, in partnership with local Aboriginal elders, to embed Australian Indigenous knowledge and perspectives in curriculum throughout the university. The program is in the process of development and more information is available from Tom Molyneux, Coordinator of Indigenous inclusion.

The event recording is available from the Inclusive Education Community of Practice web page.

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