New PebblePad guide helps Deakin students build their portfolios

New PebblePad guide helps Deakin students build their portfolios

New PebblePad Guide helps students build their portfolios

04
NOVEMBER, 2021
Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning
Digital Resources
Earlier this year, the Deakin Learning Futures team added eportfolio platform PebblePad to our suite of digital tools to support student learning. Students can use portfolios to help collate and curate evidence of their learning and capabilities. They can reflect on their learning journey and identify connections between different learning experiences across and beyond their course.

Now we’re launching our new PebblePad Student Guide to support students in using PebblePad to build their portfolio of evidence of what they know and what they can do. The Guide introduces PebblePad and eportfolios, coupled with illustrated step-by-step instructions and videos to assist students in building their skills and familiarity with PebblePad. It also includes helpful hints and suggestions about organising and contextualising evidence of student learning and achievement

If you use PebblePad in your unit, you can link directly to the PebblePad Student Guide from your unit site. Students can also access the Guide from the student CloudDeakin guides.

To learn more about PebblePad and how you can use it in your teaching, check out the ‘Using Portfolios for Learning and Teaching’ resource on DTeach.

 

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Supporting online teaching at Deakin with Active Learning Workshops

Supporting online teaching at Deakin with Active Learning Workshops

Supporting online teaching at Deakin with Active Learning Workshops

28

OCTOBER, 2021

Teaching & Learning online
Active Learning
Teaching resources

Transitioning teaching online requires new ways of teaching, facilitating, and using software that has previously gone unnoticed. It brings many challenges in a rapidly developing environment, with new or updated software features and provides an opportunity for innovative and inclusive teaching and learning.  

To help this transition at Deakin, Senior Education Developers, Joan Sutherland and Tara Draper, experts in applying digital technology to online learning, facilitated a series of 30-minute online workshops. The workshops are designed to support teaching and learning staff to implement strategies and software to facilitate active learning online. Participants actively experienced activities and software from a learner perspective. The series covered a suite of individual software and focused on strategies applicable across different software.  

Joan and Tara reflected on the recent workshops.

‘We have both enjoyed facilitating the 10 sessions across October and sharing our knowledge with the 268 registered participants. All training was well received with participants overwhelmingly indicating that it was relevant to their needs; they gained new knowledge and skills; and built confidence using different software.’ 

 
Support Resources 

Asynchronous resources from the series are now available to all Deakin staff.

  • Microsoft Teams staff training resource
  • Microsoft Teams student training resource
  • Mentimeter for connected learning
  • Zoom for online classes and seminars
  • Mural
  • Practical tips for facilitating online
  • Padlet for active learning 
  • Collaboration use case library
  • Microsoft Teams use case library

 

Positive feedback and planning for future workshops

Participants responded positively to the training, particularly the authentic and practical active learning from a students’ viewpoint. Participants built capability using different features and planned to incorporate them into their teaching. 

The session duration received mixed reviews. Many liked the short practical aspects of the ‘How-to’ type sessions. Others suggested longer sessions to allow more opportunities to explore key concepts or respond to specific needs or questions. Joan and Tara will revisit the session design to ensure ample opportunities for varying skill levels and more targeted training based on prior experience. They will also include the opportunity for participants to suggest areas they would like to address within the training session.

Consistently participants recommended that all staff should attend future workshops. This positive feedback reflects the ongoing commitment by Deakin Learning Futures to support faculties and teaching and learning teams to deliver online. 

Get involved 

If you would like to get involved in working groups for digital collaboration, please register your interest online. Further updates will be sent in early 2022. Please let us know if you have any suggestions for future training via the online feedback form.

 

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New Zoom training resources launched at Deakin

New Zoom training resources launched at Deakin

New Zoom training resources launched at Deakin

27

OCTOBER, 2021

Digital resources
Teaching & Learning

Deakin Learning Futures is proud to announce the launch of new Zoom training resources for Deakin staff. If you use Zoom for your online classes and seminars, you can now access convenient how-to guides and helpful tips on Deakin Learning Futures’ Training Resource SharePoint site 

The ‘Using Zoom for Teaching and Learning’ resources were developed in collaboration with faculty Learning Environments and CloudDeakin support teams, teaching staff and eSolutions. 

The resources are divided into four key sections: 

Getting started with Zoom
An introduction to using the Zoom integration within your unit site to schedule and manage classes and seminars, and recommended settings when using Zoom for teaching.

Managing and sharing Zoom recordings
Guides on how to record Zoom classes and seminars, share recordings with your students, and manage your storage limits. 

Using Zoom on-campus
Information to connect Zoom with the AV facilities in on-campus teaching spaces and tips to manage multiple cohorts in one session. 

Engaging students in Zoom classes and seminars 
Options and suggestions to make your Zoom classes and seminars as interactive, inclusive, and engaging as possible. 


We’ll also share key updates and Zoom releases through the site’s newsfeed, so ‘follow’ us to stay up to date!
 Check out the resources now. 

If you have any tips or examples on how you use Zoom for learning and teaching – we’d love to hear from you. If you would like to contribute or if there’s a topic or function you’d like to see covered just contact Jo Elliott at joanne.elliott@deakin.edu.au 

We’ll be decommissioning Blackboard Collaborate Ultra in 2022 so these resources will help you transition your online sessions to Zoom. 

 

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What students think of Deakin extension tools and special consideration

What students think of Deakin extension tools and special consideration

What students think of Deakin extension tools and special consideration
22
OCTOBER, 2021

Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning
Learning Innovations
Team Collaboration

At Deakin, students apply for extensions and special considerations to help them complete their assignments. Deakin student Shelby, supported by the Office of the Dean of Students, collated real-life stories from students who have used these support services before to better understand the experience. These were her findings.

Overall, the students I spoke to were satisfied with the extension tools and special consideration process.

‘My experience with the tool has been relatively pleasant since the format is user-friendly and straightforward. It doesn’t require a lot of ‘preparation’ to apply for extension.

 

‘Mailing the unit chair [for extension] was helpful because she was able to direct me to certain websites/phone numbers to contact if my anxiety got worse. While the extension website/cloud Deakin site also has this information, it was a very comforting and accepting situation to have the unit chair reassuring me.’

Although the process was smooth, some students felt that the deadline updates on the CloudDeakin sites could be improved. One student noted:

‘Having an approved extension on the email but not on the cloud Deakin site gets very confusing and anxiety-inducing. I have, in these cases, had to email the unit chair in urgency to confirm if I have indeed received an extension (since the email mentions an extension but the cloud site drop box isn’t always updated).’

Another student, unfortunately, did not have a good experience when applying for their extension:

‘I was applying for the extension with my access plan because I had a serious flare-up of my condition that started just before the trimester began. I emailed the [lecturer] with my access plan asking for a one-week extension. [They] asked to call me in the reply, so I agreed thinking [they] wanted to help me check I was going to be fine like my lecturers normally do. However, when I answered the phone, I was met with a concerned voice asking how I was going to be able to do medicine* if I can’t be organised and do the basic assignments.’

The student’s request was successful, but they remembered feeling questioned and humiliated during the process.

How can Deakin staff better support students to improve their study experience during a pandemic?

After speaking with students, here are my recommendations:

  • Ensure all Deakin students are aware of the extension tools and special consideration process. Posting details on CloudDeakin’s news at the start of every trimester could help those who need to apply.
  • Understand that students with pre-existing medical conditions or disabilities might experience more difficulties due to the pandemic.
  • Reflect the new deadline on student’s CloudDeakin unit site once an extension has been approved. This helps to reassure and provide students with more certainty – something that is very much needed as we make our way out of this uncertain pandemic climate.

*All student stories have been anonymised and details have been modified to protect their identity. This project was funded by the Office of the Dean of Students, Student-Initiated Project fund.

 

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Reflecting on ‘The power of Open of Educational Resources for inclusivity’ events at Deakin

Reflecting on ‘The power of Open of Educational Resources for inclusivity’ events at Deakin

Reflecting on ‘The power of Open of Educational Resources for inclusivity’ events at Deakin
21
OCTOBER, 2021
Inclusive education
Teaching resources

Danni McCarthy, the coordinator of Deakin’s Inclusive Education Community of Practice (CoP), interviews Angie Williamson, Open Education Program Coordinator, about the recent panel and hackathon events exploring the power of Open of Educational Resources (OERs) for inclusivity.

In the panel discussion, you suggested OERs have different meanings and importance for people dependent on their reason for developing them. So, what is the power of OERs for you?

This is a big question. For me, it would be the access of OERs. If we use open resources, especially as a textbook, we provide equity amongst the students because they all have access to the same resources at the same time. Some students don’t have to wait for their pay to buy a textbook or to access a library copy. The power of OERs means everyone has the same opportunities.

What do you hope for Deakin and its emerging practices and developments with Open Education Resources?

We have made a good start at Deakin and learned a lot this year. At the hackathon, we considered aspects of open education that align with our innovative environment. Ideas such as ease of use, peer review and challenging traditional assessment formats resonated most with those who attended. This year we have been dipping our toes in the water to work out the best path forward and I think this is moving us towards a bigger conversation.

Creating OERs is a great idea but from a practical perspective, is the time it takes to produce OERs one of the biggest challenges?

It’s true. It takes time to create resources. However, getting started doesn’t have to be a major task. Start small – use or adapt a chapter of an open text or work with colleagues to create a resource. Including OER searching in the process for reviewing your unit content is another easy way to start.

So, if people are interested in getting started with OERs, how would you like them to proceed?

A good place to start is the Open Education Resources (OERs) and DRM-free resources library guide at Deakin. This has lots of great information on searching for and using OERs. You can also contact me (angie.w@deakin.edu.au) or your Liaison Librarian.

Thanks so much for taking the time to chat with me about OERs. I also wanted to say that Dr Eseta Tualaulelei, who presented at the CoP session, has done some great work in this space.

Yes, she really was inspirational and gave a tangible way for us to learn about (and get started) with OERs. I encourage everyone to have a look at the recording of the panel discussion  The power of Open Education Resources for inclusive education or you can have a look at Eseta’s work Gems and nuggets Subtitle: Multicultural education for young children and Hidden treasures.

 

 

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Deakin CloudFirst 103 (Re)design kickstart workshops are back

Deakin CloudFirst 103 (Re)design kickstart workshops are back

Deakin CloudFirst 103 (Re)design kickstart workshops are back

13

OCTOBER, 2021

CloudFirst
Digital Tools
Teaching & Learning
online

Back by popular demand, the CloudFirst 103 workshops are once again being delivered by the CloudFirst team. These workshops support Deakin teaching and learning teams to design their unit sites and are running in time for the start of the 2022 academic year.

CloudFirst 103 is an online guide for academic staff outlining how they can build a unit site. The two upcoming workshops help you start your do-it-yourself redesign, giving you a foundation to continue using the self-paced CloudFirst 103 resources during Trimester 2 this year in readiness for a 2022 launch.

The workshops and resources in CloudFirst 103 provide the knowledge and tools needed to work through the three stages of unit development: high-level mapping, learning activity design, and content production of a range of different types of learning resources, including videos, podcasts, images, and interactives.

The CloudFirst team are also able to schedule some check-in sessions with CloudFirst Senior Educational Designers after the two workshops. These sessions will be dependent on participant interest and will provide advice regarding your queries and progress.

To get the most out of the workshops, you will need to do a small amount of pre and post work on your unit.

  • Workshop 1: How do you design a unit for CloudFirst delivery?
    Thursday 28 October, 10am-12pm

  • Workshop 2: How do you build a unit site that is an engaging and interactive learning space?
    Thursday 4 November, 10am-12pm

Attendance is limited, so don’t miss your chance to get started using the CloudFirst approach and register now. Deakin staff can register through Zoom.

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