Congratulations to Deakin’s 2020 AAUT winners

Congratulations to Deakin’s 2020 AAUT winners

Congratulations to Deakin’s 2020 AAUT winners

25

FEBRUARY, 2021

Recognition and rewards
AAUT

Deakin University has been awarded one program award and two citations at the 2020 Australian Awards for University Teaching (AAUT). Established in 1997 by the Australian Government, the awards celebrate excellence in higher education and recognise learning and teaching programs or services that have a positive impact on the student experience.

‘Deakin is delighted to congratulate our three award-winning teams,’ said Professor Liz Johnson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, Education. ‘It is terrific to see excellence in learning and teaching recognised nationally particularly after the intense effort from all our teaching teams during 2020 to keep our students learning and progressing in their degrees despite the disruption of the global pandemic. It is also pleasing to see success for teaching teams who demonstrate collaboration at its very best.’

The winners

Program Award

Assoc. Prof. John White, Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston received an Award for Programs that Enhance Learning for Deakin’s Wildlife and Conservation Biology degree, which provides students with the opportunity to take part in immersive international experiences and develop skills, experience and attitudes to become highly employable conservation practitioners, ready to tackle the global environmental challenges facing society today and into the future.

Citations

Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri received a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning for their work in supporting international students to develop employability skills in the Information Systems programs.

Ms Simone Tyrell, Assoc. Prof. Kerrie Bridson, Dr Leanne Ngo, Ms Kim Phu, Ms Sharon Chua, Dr Micaela Spiers and Assoc. Prof. Michael Volkov received a Citation for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning for the development of program wide resources which support business students’ professional literacies.

Learn more about the AAUT

Deakin University provides support to anyone interested in applying for an AAUT award. A range of mentors from around the University, who have previously won an AAUT award, work with applicants to produce high quality submissions. For more on the AAUT process, past winners and how to apply in the future please visit our recognition and rewards page.

Assoc. Prof. John White, Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston

Assoc. Prof. Raylene Cooke, Assoc. Prof. John White  and Assoc. Prof. Mike Weston

Dr Craig Parker and Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri

Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri and Dr Craig Parker

Ms Simone Tyrell, Assoc. Prof. Kerrie Bridson, Dr Leanne Ngo, Ms Kim Phu, Ms Sharon Chua, Dr Micaela Spiers and Assoc. Prof. Michael Volkov

Assoc. Prof. Kerrie Bridson, Ms Simone Tyrell, Dr Leanne Ngo, Assoc. Prof. Michael Volkov, Ms Sharon Chua, Ms Kim Phu and Dr Micaela Spiers

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PebblePad Week – Using portfolios for learning and teaching

PebblePad Week – Using portfolios for learning and teaching

PebblePad Week – Using portfolios for learning and teaching

25

FEBRUARY, 2021

Digital Learning
Good Practice
PebblePad
Portfolio

Deakin recently added eportfolio platform PebblePad to our suite of digital tools to support student learning. Portfolios can be used to help students collate and curate evidence of their learning and capabilities, reflect on their learning journey and identify connections between different learning experiences across and beyond their course.

Throughout February, teaching teams along with DLF Pods, faculty Learning Environments teams and the Deakin Library, gathered to learn more about PebblePad, portfolios and how to use these to support student learning.

One of the most popular sessions was a panel discussion in which four academics shared their experiences of using PebblePad to support student learning in different contexts. Dr Wayne Read, from the Faculty of Business and Law’s WIL team, incorporated PebblePad into a project-based Entrepreneurship Experience unit to help students self-assess their skills, set learning goals and reflect on their progress, as well as creating a resource they can use to showcase and promote their project to potential investors.

Dr James Lucas and Joleen Ryan from the Social Work Field Education team in the Faculty of Health shared how they used PebblePad to streamline assessment and administrative tasks associated with student placements, creating a simpler and more integrated experience for students, university staff and placement supervisors.

Finally, Dr Elicia Lanham, Academic Director (Teaching) in the School of IT, discussed a course-wide approach, using portfolios to support IT students to explore career options, identify their skill development needs and reflect on their learning and skill development as they progress through their course.

More information about how Wayne, Elicia, James and Joleen are using PebblePad, including sample workbooks, is available in our new resource, Using Portfolios in learning and teaching. This resource also includes more information about the benefits of portfolios for student learning, and how to get started with PebblePad.

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Using online simulations to support the development of student leadership skills

Using online simulations to support the development of student leadership skills

Using online simulations to support the development of student leadership skills

10

FEBRUARY, 2021

Teaching Online
Good Practice

In their final unit, students in the Graduate Certificate of Humanitarian Leadership engage in an intensive five-day simulation of a real-world humanitarian situation which gives them the opportunity to demonstrate leadership behaviours and apply appropriate humanitarian strategies to existing and emerging humanitarian contexts. Students take on roles within the senior leadership team of an NGO while academic staff impersonate characters that NGO members would typically interact with in the course of their work.

Reimagining an intensive unit

In 2020, Associate Professor Phil Connors, a founder of the course, worked with the DLF faculty pod for Arts & Education to reimagine the simulation in an online environment. During the five days of the online simulation, students commenced with a structured small group session, the Action Learning Sets, to explore challenges and identify solutions to a given problem. This would be followed by four to five hours of the actual simulation incorporating a rapid team review (RTR) session facilitated by coaches. The simulation activity was wrapped up on day five with a series of debrief sessions and feedback from peers.

During the simulation period, students and their coaches used Microsoft Teams for meetings, debriefs and peer feedback sessions. Academic staff members shared insights and collaborated throughout the simulation in a private, staff-only, channel within the Microsoft Teams environment. They also recorded their observations of student leadership behaviours directly from within the Microsoft Teams space using a third-party app. Breakout rooms in Zoom were used to carry out an individual assessment activity where students gave a presentation to a high value donor (HVD) on their organisation’s crisis response strategy.

The benefits for students

Simulations bring about multiple benefits to the learners, including the opportunity to apply theory to real-life situations, which improves learning, engagement and enjoyment of the course.  While the main purpose of the simulation was to develop students’ leadership skills, they also had the chance to cultivate a range of other skills such as decision-making, problem-solving and effective communication.

Learn more about delivering online simulations

In this video, Assoc. Prof. Connors talks to Isma Seetal about the unit and the online simulation.  He also gives us a tour of the Microsoft Teams site that was created for the simulation.

 

 

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ACEN Virtual Summit 2020 wrap-up

ACEN Virtual Summit 2020 wrap-up

ACEN Virtual Summit 2020 wrap-up

20

JANUARY, 2021

WIL
Teaching Online

As for many organisations, 2020 was the year of doing things differently for the Australian Cooperative Education Network (ACEN). To ensure that its members had continuing access to professional development despite COVID-19, ACEN made the decision to hold its first fully online two-day annual conference in late 2020. The WIL community response was fantastic, with 583 registrations from Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and Malaysia.

Key themes

Together participants explored issues reflecting the key theme of ‘Beyond 2020: Creating the Future with WIL’ through showcases, refereed paper presentations, interactive roundtables and social spaces and sessions. The eight sub-themes included the following:

  • Enhancing employability through WIL.
  • Delivering quality WIL.
  • Service learning and community engagement.
  • Globalising WIL.
  • Collaborative stakeholder engagement.
  • Innovative, scalable and sustainable WIL.
  • Indigenous engagement: Building capacity through WIL.
  • WIL leadership: Shaping the Future.

Deakin’s contribution

Many Deakin people attended and presented, such as Dr Karen Le Rossignol, who shared her work on ‘Perceptions of Disruption and Uncertainty in WIL Digital Storyworlds’. Assoc. Prof. Harsh Suri and Fred Kaider shared early findings and insights from a large collaborative project looking at ‘Virtual WIL: Technology Enabled WIL Placements and Projects’ and Assoc. Prof. Rola Ajjawi, Prof. David Boud and Dr Joanna Tai from the CRADLE team hosted a roundtable on ‘Assessment Design for Work Integrated Learning’.

Deakin’s support for this event included hosting via our digital infrastructure and contributions from Dr Lisa Milne (Lecturer, Teaching capability, DLF, ACEN VicTas Chapter committee member) and Kathryn Whitney (Portfolio Manager, Engagement, Arts & Ed) to secure sponsorship, deliver a digital vision for the event, handle programme planning and host sessions on the day. The organising committee also included our ACEN colleagues Judie Kay and Leoni Russell from RMIT, Rachael Baron from Latrobe University and Prof. Susan Rowland from University of Queensland.

Record attendance

Attendance at individual sessions was high, with some attracting up to a hundred participants. This highlights the affordances of virtual sessions, given that except for the traditionally large keynote and townhall sessions, our physical venues would struggle to accommodate such high numbers. Just over 50% of those who participated in the evaluation activity indicated they were first time attendees, indicating that online options seem to be more easily accessible – an important lesson to reflect on in planning for events in 2021.

Join us in 2021

ACEN worked hard over 2020, and will do so again 2021, to provide online webinars, resource and opportunities to discuss the range of local and international WIL community responses to a global pandemic that has had a strong impact on WIL practitioners. Deakin is an institutional member of ACEN, so all of these events are free for Deakin employees to attend. There is also a members discount for attendance at the next ACEN conference in October 2021. We hope to see you there!

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The Q&A bot that answers student queries in Microsoft Teams

The Q&A bot that answers student queries in Microsoft Teams

The Q&A bot that answers student queries in Microsoft Teams

14

JANUARY, 2021

Teaching Online
Digital Innovation

Deakin is currently running a pilot of a Q&A bot that answers routine student queries in Microsoft Teams. The bot integrates with Microsoft Teams class environments and uses artificial intelligence to build a body of knowledge about the unit with a focus on unit administration. Students can then ask the bot questions in a designated Q&A channel in Microsoft Teams and receive answers about assignment deadlines and locations of learning resources 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

How Dr Elicia Lanham uses Q&A bot

We spoke to Dr Elicia Lanham (Senior Lecturer in Information Technology) who is piloting the Q&A bot in her Microsoft Teams class environment as part of SIT772 – Database and Information Retrieval.

Dr Lanham finds that using Microsoft Teams in teaching and learning has facilitated communication between students and instructors. Microsoft Teams has made it easier for students to post questions for their peers and unit chairs, leading to a spike in student engagement that has extended and enhanced classroom learning.

Some of these questions are routinely administrative in nature and could potentially be answered using a Q&A bot, freeing up the academic to concentrate on questions that require higher-order thinking to dig deeper into the learning materials.

In this video, you can learn more about how Dr Lanham has used Microsoft Teams and the Q&A bot in her unit.

 

Implementing the Q&A bot with Alan Longmuir

The Emergent Technologies, AI and Big Data team from eSolutions is leading the pilot of the bot for Deakin and has been working closely with Dr Lanham on its implementation in the Microsoft Teams class environment for her unit.

The team is also leading a pilot of using the Q&A bot within CloudDeakin unit sites, positioning Deakin as the first university in Australia to experiment its use in the D2L environment.

We spoke with Alan Longmuir (Emergent Technologies Manager) who gave us a demonstration of how the bot works.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about the Q&A bot you can contact Alan Longmuir at alan.longmuir@deakin.edu.au.

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Transition Pedagogy or panic-gogy: The first year experience of emergency remote teaching

Transition Pedagogy or panic-gogy: The first year experience of emergency remote teaching

Transition pedagogy or panic-gogy: The first year experience of emergency remote teaching

10

DECEMBER, 2020

Inclusive Education
Teaching Online
Good Practice

In early December Professor Sally Kift presented a talk at Deakin’s Inclusive Education Community of Practice about the first year experience of emergency remote teaching due to COVID-19. In her talk Professor Kift ranged widely across data, research and good practice frameworks to articulate what we needed most to learn from our experiences in 2020.

Acknowledging the ‘pedagogy of kindness’ that students had acknowledged gratefully in their surveys at Deakin and elsewhere this year, she developed further the theme of fostering strong relationships between students, and between students and staff, as a foundation for learning, mental wellbeing and ongoing connection with university.

She noted the strong 2020 student success and retention figures at Deakin, including for several equity groups, and pointed to our pre-existing foundations for quality online and inclusive education, quoting at length from the Inclusive Education and Division of Student Life (DSL) student support websites, and even our Unit Minimum Standards. She also acknowledged CRADLE’s leading contribution to contemporary assessment research, in particular around online assessment.

She revisited the Transition Pedagogy she pioneered, drawing on recent research and good practice at a range of universities to demonstrate the ongoing usefulness of this framework as a way to organise the multitude of considerations that are necessary to support diverse students into university. These examples showed fresh ways of thinking, such as fostering autonomy through developing assessment literacy, using interactive planners to help students to organise their time, and taking a whole of institution approach to supporting students’ mental health.

She reflected that students commencing university in wholly online mode were coping with an even greater cognitive load:

They are learning content and skills, and they’re learning the platform, and they are learning how to learn online, and how to manage the first year transitions, and for many they are managing their mental wellbeing. Acknowledge the importance of wellbeing, talk about it!

She also noted that students entering university in 2021 ‘could be a fragile, vulnerable cohort who have just got through’, and it will be doubly important to avoid assuming entry knowledge, skills and capabilities:

If anything has become so abundantly clear out of the pandemic for all of us and for the students who are coming in in 2020-21, it is the reality of digital poverty. And that the burden has not fallen equally.

Academic and professional staff should find much in the recording of Professor Kift’s talk to enrich and refresh their thinking as they move through Trimester 3 or into Trimester 1, 2021, about how to teach and support students well online or on campus.

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