Give us your feedback with the CloudDeakin User Experience online survey

Give us your feedback with the CloudDeakin User Experience online survey

Give us your feedback with the CloudDeakin User Experience online survey

18

NOVEMBER, 2020

Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning
Learning Innovations

What is your experience of using CloudDeakin? We’re currently running a CloudDeakin User Experience online survey seeking feedback from academic staff to improve our CloudDeakin sites. The rapid transition to online teaching and learning due to COVID-19 has offered us an opportunity to review our current practices and to evaluate how our use meets the needs of our students and staff for the longer term.

We’ve recently run a series of User Experience (UX) workshops to learn more about staff experiences and gather ideas. We’re also running the CloudDeakin User Experience online survey to make sure that all staff have the chance to provide their feedback on Deakin’s current digital learning environment.

We want to better understand the realities of the staff and student experience so we can clearly identify and prioritise the areas and issues that need to be addressed. It’s important that our future plans be based on real lived experiences so we can truly improve the day-to-day experience of our staff and students while teaching and learning online.

The feedback we receive will inform our recommendations for changes to the CloudDeakin minimum standards for course and unit sites. Sharing your experiences and ideas can help to shape the outcome.

If you’re a Deakin academic staff member who has experience with designing, creating and supporting unit and course sites, take the CloudDeakin User Experience online survey to give us your feedback.

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Create a do-it-yourself online unit site with CloudFirst 103

Create a do-it-yourself online unit site with CloudFirst 103

Create a do-it-yourself online unit site with CloudFirst 103

16

November, 2020

CloudFirst
Teaching Online
Good Practice
Digital Innovations

How do you build a CloudFirst unit site? We’ve launched CloudFirst 103, a guide for academic staff that outlines how they can build a do-it-yourself CloudFirst unit site. CloudFirst 103 provides the knowledge needed to work through the three stages of unit development: high-level mapping, learning activity design, and content production of a range of different types of learning resources including videos, podcasts, images and interactives. Academic staff can also access a series of activities outlining the steps required to develop everything needed for a do-it-yourself CloudFirst unit.

CloudFirst 103 is designed so that academics can use it the way that best suits them. Topics can be worked through in a linear sequence to create a DIY CloudFirst unit, or dipped into to build expertise in a specific area of interest, such as video production, H5P interactives or embedded discussions.

Many topics also include an advanced section for those already skilled in that area, or those returning on another CloudFirst transformation that want to take their design skills to the next level.

Deakin staff can join CloudFirst 103 and get started creating their own online units.

CloudFirst 103 builds on the information in the CloudFirst 101 and CloudFirst 102 resources, which guide academics through the CloudFirst learning principles and approach to curriculum design and showcase practical strategies for teaching online from academics running CloudFirst units.

The CloudFirst team

The CloudFirst team was established in late 2017 to transform learning design at Deakin and create premium online exemplars.

The team has worked with over 100 contributors including academics, faculty support staff, librarians, students and external consultants to develop over 600,000 words, 800 videos, 500 images and 400 interactive objects to support student learning across a range of disciplines, including Business, Law, Education and Mathematics. Since the launch of CloudFirst, there have been 16,000 enrolments in CloudFirst units across 5000 students.

The CloudFirst team continues to work on course transformation across all faculties at Deakin and has been ramping up capability building through online training and live workshops, both as a response to academics wanting to progress their own CloudFirst journeys, and the need to transition learning online due to COVID-19.

CloudFirst 103 represents the biggest instructional undertaking of the CloudFirst team to date. To create CloudFirst103 the team refined all their processes, templates, instructions and development tools, including only what’s necessary to achieve a quality DIY CloudFirst unit.

Whether progressing through CloudFirt 103 individually or as part of a teaching team, we are excited to see how academics interact with the resource and to showcase the results of DIY CloudFirst transformations.

Visit the CloudFirst website to learn more.

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First Nations views on tackling racism and bias in learning and teaching

First Nations views on tackling racism and bias in learning and teaching

First Nations views on tackling racism and bias in learning and teaching

30

OCTOBER, 2020

Inclusive Education
Good Practice

Banners for the Inclusive Education Community of Practice and the Office of Indigenous Strategy & Innovation

More than 100 Deakin staff came together via Zoom in October to learn effective ways to tackle racism and unconscious bias in education, with a panel of Wadawarrung regional educational leaders leading the discussion. The panel was co-hosted by the Inclusive Education Community of Practice and the Office of Indigenous Strategy and Innovation, with Prof. Mark Rose, Pro Vice-Chancellor, Indigenous Strategy & Innovation, moderating the event.

Panellists

Prof. Mark Rose (Moderator): Pro Vice-Chancellor Indigenous Strategy & Innovation, Deakin University

Sandra Brogden: Koorie Education Coordinator, Department of Education and Training Geelong

Ilona Sliwa: Koorie Engagement Support Officer, Department of Education and Training Geelong

Denise Charles: Koorie Engagement Support Officer, Department of Education and Training Geelong

Deb Milera: Officer Indigenous Inclusion, Deakin University

 

Panellists addressed the uncomfortable subject of whether racism exists in Australia, and in our education system, with a ‘truth-telling’ but ultimately positive approach. The statistics speak for themselves: 432 Aboriginal deaths in custody since 1991, a suicide rate twice that of non-Aboriginal Australians, and surveys showing widespread negative bias towards Aboriginal Australians. The panellists also shared moving personal stories of the long-term human impact of racism, not least by teachers in schools.

With only 2% of school teachers in Australia being Aboriginal, panellists reasoned the wider non-Aboriginal community needed to work with Aboriginal people to achieve significant change. They urged teachers to go beyond a symbolic, ‘cultural Kontiki tour’ approach to Aboriginal history and culture to educate themselves more deeply about our shared Australian history, build relationships with community members, reflect on assumptions and bias, and engage in difficult conversations to tackle racism when issues arose.

The panel emphasised the importance of taking a systemic approach to developing students’ (and teachers’) knowledge and respect for Aboriginal history and culture, including embedding this knowledge in curriculum. The panellists have been doing this work for some time in regional schools, and have shared some links to useful resources on the event page on the Inclusive Education Community of Practice website.

Prof. Rose outlined the program being undertaken by the Office of Indigenous Strategy and Innovation at Deakin, in partnership with local Aboriginal elders, to embed Australian Indigenous knowledge and perspectives in curriculum throughout the university. The program is in the process of development and more information is available from Tom Molyneux, Coordinator of Indigenous inclusion.

The event recording is available from the Inclusive Education Community of Practice web page.

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Register your interest in attending a CloudDeakin UX workshop

Register your interest in attending a CloudDeakin UX workshop

Register your interest in attending a CloudDeakin UX workshop

21

OCTOBER, 2020

Digital Innovation
Good Practice
Teaching Online

We are seeking expressions of interest from academic staff who have experience with creating, maintaining and using unit sites, and in particular those who may be new to teaching with CloudDeakin. Workshop sessions will last 1.5 hours and will be conducted via Zoom from 4 to 6 November, facilitated by our Deakin UX specialists. Participation is limited and will be representative across all faculties and roles. Acceptance will be confirmed via email.

In response to COVID-19, academic staff have put a massive amount of effort into the rapid transition to online teaching and learning. This change has urged us to use our tools and environments in new ways to design and deliver information, resources and learning for students. This presents us with an opportunity to review how current practice has been impacted by the rapid transition, and to evaluate how our methods meet the needs of our students and staff in the long term.

This review will follow a structured approach based on UX fundamentals to gather feedback and personal experiences from academic staff and students. The information will be drawn together with specialist UX evaluations and other sources of data to inform a set of recommendations for refinements to our minimum standards (refer clauses 66-68) and practices.

Register your interest  in participating.

What is UX?

User Experience or UX design is a commitment to building products (or services) that are created with the person in mind. It starts with studying who the customers are and what they need and taking that information to provide products and services that improve the experience people have when using a system or service. Learn more at our UX Digital Centre of Excellence.

Register your interest in attending a Virtual UX Workshop for academic staff.

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Congratulations Dr Madeleine Schultz, winner of the RACI Chemistry Educator of the Year Award

Congratulations Dr Madeleine Schultz, winner of the RACI Chemistry Educator of the Year Award

Congratulations Dr Madeleine Schultz, winner of the RACI Chemistry Educator of the Year Award
21
OCTOBER, 2020
Good Practice
Awards and Recognition
Dr Madeleine Schultz, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry in Deakin’s School of Life and Environmental Science (LES) has recently been awarded the Chemistry Educator of the Year award by the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI). The RACI has acted as the key body advocating the interests and activities of the chemical sciences since 1917 and the Chemistry Educator of the Year award is designed to encourage developing teachers in undergraduate or postgraduate University courses.

‘I am absolutely delighted to receive this highly competitive award,’ said Dr Madeleine Schultz. ‘My twin passions are improving student learning through the use of evidence-based teaching practices, and incorporating sustainability into chemistry education.’

Madeleine’s educational research explores improved approaches to support students of all ages to learn chemistry via better understanding of student backgrounds, development of scaffolded online modules and explicit use of multiple representations. Together with LES colleagues, she has investigated the complex array of factors impacting success in large first year units SLE133 and SLE155, and how engagement was impacted by the move online in 2020. In parallel with this, she has a strong background in supporting the professional development of chemistry teachers to use best practice for holistic understanding. Since commencing at Deakin in 2018, she has initiated professional development workshops for LES sessional staff, focussing on the specific challenges of teaching chemistry and other sciences.

Following an undergraduate science/law degree at ANU with first class honours in chemistry (1995), Madeleine moved to the University of California (Berkeley) for her PhD (2000). She completed her world tour with a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Heidelberg before returning to Australia. She has since worked at three Australian institutions as her research focus moved gradually from doing chemistry to improving the teaching of chemistry.

Madeleine founded and directs the Chemistry Discipline Network, a community of practice for tertiary chemistry educators. In 2019 she co-developed (with Dr Seamus Delaney, from the School of Education) the UNESCO-funded Periodic Table of Sustainable Elements outreach activities and was part of a Deakin team that brought this event to seven disadvantaged schools in rural and remote Victoria.

Madeleine recently spoke with us about her continuing commitment to the betterment of teaching practices. ‘I would love to chat with anyone interested in chemistry or science education, schools outreach, pedagogical content knowledge for chemistry, misconceptions, or student efficacy.’

Congratulations Madeleine!

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Explore the SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase

Explore the SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase

Explore the SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase

20

OCTOBER, 2020

Digital Innovation
Teaching and Learning
Good Practice

The SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase was created to give teaching staff from the Faculty of Science, Engineering and the Built Environment (SEBE) the opportunity to share examples of good practice with their colleagues.

Created by the SEBE Deakin Learning Futures (DLF) faculty pod, the showcase includes videos made by SEBE faculty members providing inspiring examples of teaching and learning practices, and is open to all SEBE staff. The videos were developed with five questions in mind:

  1. Context:  What is the teaching context of the example?
  2. Need for change: What prompted you to make the changes?
  3. Innovation: What did you do and how did you learn to do it?
  4. Evaluation: Where you happy with the result and what was the feedback?
  5. Advice: What advice would you give to others who might want to try something similar?

Due to the transition to online teaching in response to COVID-19 the showcase has a particular focus on digital learning, from tours of unit site design to run-throughs of innovative assessment tasks. Staff can watch short summaries of how their colleagues have overcome the challenges of teaching online and access practical tips on how to incorporate different methods into their own teaching practice.

 

Watch a SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase video

We’ve put together some of our favourite examples from the showcase for you to explore.

Live streaming lectures

Damien Callahan and Madeleine Schultz discuss how they used livestreamed lectures in SLE133: Chemistry in Our World to increase student engagement and interaction. When students log into the livestream lecture, they can see a screen with text/images and also the document camera screen. They can participate in live polls and communicate via the chat.

Virtual fieldtrip

Prue Francis showcases an innovative solution to adapting a field trip exercise in her first year Marine Environments unit. Students would normally conduct a sampling exercise of a marine rocky shore at Barwon Heads Marine Sanctuary using 1m x 1m quadrats and transect lines. A coding sequence was used to allocate a personalised ‘virtual quadrat’ to each student. Prue used videos and H5P activities to build students’ ability to identify the species present.

Using Padlet to simulate the studio experience

Michael Sharman describes how the design studio experience for students in the Bachelor of Design Architecture was enabled online using a combination Padlet and Zoom. Padlet is a Deakin-supported web-based platform that works as a space for students to post their design work. Combined with annotation tools in Zoom, students were able to comment on each other’s work and staff were able to provide feedback as students’ projects progressed.

The SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase is now open to all SEBE staff through CloudDeakin.

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