Live-caption your Zoom classes for accessibility and greater learning

Live-caption your Zoom classes for accessibility and greater learning

Livecaption your Zoom classes for accessibility and greater learning

27

SEPTEMBER, 2021

Good practice
Teaching & learning online
Accessibility

You might think of captions as necessary for students with a hearing impairment to participate in your online class or seminar. And while that is true, captions serve other purposes too. They make it easier for students to take part in class when there’s background noise (hi housemates, siblings, kids, and pets!), when English is not their first language or when first encountering discipline-specific terms.

Some students, like Deakin Bachelor of Occupational Therapy student, Daniela Skocic find it easier to process and remember information when they hear it and can read it simultaneously. ‘Processing what has been said, while reading it, helps me remember better and make better sense of the information,’ says Dani. Without live-captions, Dani needs to decide whether to attend the class live and benefit from interaction with her classmates, or to watch the recording later when the transcript is available.

A study conducted by the National Centre for Student Equity in Higher Education found that ‘in addition to the expected benefits to disabled and NESB students… lecture captions are also beneficial to students without disabilities, assisting them to absorb and review educational materials.’ Students have also reported that captions make it easier  to access their learning on the go (Tisdell and Loch, 2016).

How to turn on live-captions

To turn on live-captioning in Zoom, use the ‘Live Transcript’ button in the control bar at the bottom of your Zoom window. Then click on the ‘Enable Auto-transcription’ button.

Zoom menu bar

If you’re sharing your screen, you’ll need to click on ‘More’ in the Zoom controls and select ‘Live Transcript’ from the pop-up options.

Zoom dropdown menu to select live caption

In an MS Teams meeting, click on the ‘More options’ icon (three dots) and select ‘Live captioning’. Find out more on the Microsoft Support site.

Note that auto-transcription isn’t always perfect

Auto-transcription uses machine-generated captions, so the captioning is unlikely to be perfect. If you know that one or more of your students will rely solely on the transcripts (e.g. they may have an access plan requiring transcripts), we recommend you contact the Deakin Disability Resource Centre. You can discuss with them alternative highly accurate captioning options. However, if this is not the case, the odd transcription error won’t matter too much most of the time. As long as the message is clear to students.

You can easily make quick corrections to the captions/transcript later. Take a look at Zoom’s simple instructions on editing transcripts.

Learn more about students’ experiences of accessing learning materials

Check out Deakin science student Judzea Gatt’s recent Deakin Life blog post about her accessibility experiences – good and bad – and how she approaches her studies.

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Looking for tools to facilitate active learning online?

Looking for tools to facilitate active learning online?

Looking for tools to facilitate active learning online?

22
SEPTEMBER, 2021
Teaching & Learning
Teaching online
Innovation

Deakin Learning Futures has developed a series of online workshops to explore tools that facilitate active learning online. The Active Learning Toolkit series offers 30-minute sessions across October that will show you how different software can support active learning in your online sessions.

The workshops are facilitated by Senior Education Developers Joan Sutherland and Tara Draper, who are experts in the application of digital technology in online learning. Each workshop will be active and participants will experience the view of a student, supported by digital resources to enable them to get started using the software.

Browse the range of topics and follow the links to register for the sessions that work for you.

Active Learning Toolkit sessions

7 October
12pm
Leveraging Padlet for Active Learning
7 October
2pm
Practical tips for Facilitating Active Online Classrooms
12 October
9.30am
Getting started with MS Teams for Online Teaching
12 October
11.30am
Getting started with Zoom for Online Teaching
14 October
10am
Practical Tips for Facilitating Online Classrooms
14 October
12pm
CloudDeakin and the Zoom Learning Tool Integration
19 October
9.30am
Getting started with Zoom for Online Teaching
19 October
11.30am
Active Learning with Mentimeter
21 October
12pm
Leveraging Padlet for Active Learning
21 October
2pm
Practical Tips for Facilitating Active Online Classrooms
26 October
9.30am
Getting started with MS Teams for Online Teaching
28 October
10am
Practical Tips for Facilitating Active Online Classrooms
28 October
12pm
CloudDeakin and the Zoom Learning Tool Integration

 

 

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Free learning and teaching resources available from national online repository

Free learning and teaching resources available from national online repository

Free learning and teaching resources available from national online repository

16

SEPTEMBER, 2021

Teaching & Learning resources
Good practice

As educators, readily available information to help support ideas for our practice and research is invaluable. If you’re not already aware of the Universities Australia Learning and Teaching Repository, you might want to take some time to discover what it can offer.

The Learning and Teaching Repository is an Australian-based website that provides access to over 1,000 reports and related resources from cross-institutional research on a range of higher education topics.

Materials available for use via this online initiative are both high quality and varied in format. The collection features case studies, good practice guides, reports from online teaching projects, and learning outcomes for specific disciplines including templates and links to project websites.

The collection features regularly curated topics. For example, currently, the site highlights resources related to First Nations and the First Year Experience.

You can easily search the collection for interdisciplinary and discipline-specific material through the site’s search tool, which uses standardised tags. The repository’s content is open under a creative commons licence, meaning the resources are free to re-use and adapt if you include attribution and distribute your contributions under the same license as the original.

The government commissioned Universities Australia to create the online repository in 2017. It houses the resources produced by the Office of Learning and Teaching (OLT), its predecessor bodies and related material.

Contributions to the repository by authors associated with Australian Universities and higher education providers are also welcome. If you have any learning and teaching resources not previously published, you can submit them to the site. You can find more information on how to contribute on the website.

The repository provides continued access to these teaching and learning materials to benefit the broader higher education community. Take the time to discover more about this vital collection today.

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Getting started with Students as Partners

Getting started with Students as Partners

Getting started with Students as Partners

13
SEPTEMBER, 2021
Student partners
Teaching & Learning
Team Collaboration
It may be your first time, or it may be your one hundredth, whatever your experience is, it’s always a good idea to reflect before starting a Students as Partners (SaP) project.

There’s a lot of interest in students-as-partners these days – and for good reason. Partnering with students benefits both staff and students. Staff develop greater insight into student needs and experiences while students gain valuable employability skills and create a legacy to support the next generation.

But while the benefits of partnership are well known, getting started can be tricky.

Deakin’s Students as Partners Framework sets out four broad approaches to students-as-partners to help you consider how to approach a new partnership project. For example, maybe your goal is to get as many student ideas as possible to provide feedback on a new policy. You might take a ‘students as sounding boards’ approach and set up an online poll, or virtual discussion board, for students to submit feedback and ideas.

Alternatively, run focus groups with a specific cohort of students to understand their use of various support services. Rather than do this alone, we’d recommend you take a ‘students as influencers’ approach and hire a couple of student partners. Together, you can develop focus group questions, facilitate the session, and analyse the findings.

More information about the four approaches, and examples of how they might work, are available on the Students as Partners SharePoint site.

Graphic of four approaches to students as partners. 1. Students as sounding boards. 2. Students as influencers. 3. Students as decision makers. 4. Students as co-creators

 

Regardless of the approach you decide to take, it’s critical to reflect on two key questions before you begin:

  1. Am I truly open minded about what the outcomes or outputs of this project may be? (i.e. am I ready to share this project with student partners?)
  2. Do I have the time in my workload to support the students successfully in this project?

The questions are important because authentic partnership requires a commitment to the process of exploration and relationship-building with students, both of which can take time.

Finally, it’s important to remember why we engage in partnership in the first place – to respect and appreciate the expertise students have in what it’s like to be a student.

Successful partnership projects are mediated on the idea of reciprocal learning. Staff learning about students’ lived experiences, and students learning from staff about a discipline, project management, or how an organisation works. So before beginning, ask yourself, ‘What am I going to teach or share?’ and ‘What am I going to learn?’

To find out more, contact Dr Mollie Dollinger (mollie.dollinger@deakin.edu.au) to chat all things SaP.

You can hear from Dr Mollie Dollinger first-hand and learn more about getting started with a Students as Partners project on our latest Tales of Teaching Online podcast episode.

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How inclusive education can lead to better assessment design

How inclusive education can lead to better assessment design

How inclusive education can lead to better assessment design

06

SEPTEMBER, 2021
Teaching & Learning
Inclusive Education
Learning Innovations 

As educators, we have much to gain by recognising different ways of knowing and doing as we reimagine education and its outcomes. It is a misconception that designing inclusive assessment only benefits a few, when in fact, it impacts more learners than we imagine.

‘Students can, with difficulty, escape from the effects of poor teaching, they cannot (by definition, if they want to graduate) escape the effects of poor assessment.’ (Boud 1995, p35)

Deakin’s Dr Joanna Tai and Professor Margaret Bearman offered this provocative quote to introduce the landscape of inclusive assessment and kick off a conversation at a recent inclusive education community of practice panel event, ‘Designing inclusive assessment with neurodiversity in mind’. They grounded the discussion by outlining that inclusive assessment supports all students to show their capabilities, regardless of personal circumstances or background characteristics.

Last month’s event explored approaches to inclusive assessment design through a discussion that spanned recent research in this area, Indigenous Knowledges, and the concept of neurodiversity to explore this emerging landscape.

Dr Jessamy Gleeson began by sharing, ‘part of the design of all of our units involves moving from western models of teaching and learning to models that incorporate Indigenous Knowledges’. She challenged participants to consider how we might position ourselves differently to the demonstration of capabilities through assessment using this lens.

Jessamy identified approaches adopted at The National Indigenous Knowledges Education Research Innovation (NIKERI) Institute. Assessment tasks emphasise the importance of Indigenous voices and knowledge, draw on concepts like reflexivity and locatedness, and move beyond written tasks to use oral presentations, group work, and reflections.

Beth Radulski, autism and neurodiversity activist and researcher, at La Trobe University, explained neurodiversity is not something a person ‘has’ or ‘is’ but rather something society is. There is no list of conditions that are ‘neurodiverse’.  She frames it as a spectrum of all human brains and includes all neurotypes—even those we consider ‘the norm’ (i.e. the neurotypical brain).

Beth advocates an approach where students work towards developing their strengths rather than simply managing their limitations. In assessment, grading based on subject learning outcomes and key strengths should apply to all students, not upon cultural norms that privilege and marginalise different groups.

All presenters acknowledged that including students in the design of assessment materials is also a powerful step forward in this area.

Further exploration of how assessment affects student learning in unexpected ways is needed. The more people we listen to with expertise in different equity groups, the more robust the principles and practices of assessment will become.

 

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Deakin at STARS 2021 conference with Jo Elliott and Darci Taylor

Deakin at STARS 2021 conference with Jo Elliott and Darci Taylor

Deakin at STARS 2021 conference with Jo Elliott and Darci Taylor
03
SEPTEMBER, 2021

Teaching & Learning
Inclusive Education
Contributions
Best practice

Deakin continued its leadership in higher education with significant representation from staff sharing their innovative practice with colleagues nationally and internationally at the STARS 2021 annual conference in July. Here, Dr Jo Elliott and Darci Taylor from Deakin Learning Futures, discuss their STARS contribution on designing for inclusion and reflect on the successful event.

Too often, we treat accessibility as an accommodation, putting the onus on individual students to disclose their need for alternative learning materials.

If we design for accessibility and inclusion from the outset, it not only reduces the need for students to make such disclosures, but it can benefit all students by supporting a range of ways to engage with the content.

CloudFirst learning design incorporates Deakin’s Inclusive Education principles, through clear and scaffolded learning outcomes, the use of different media and activity types, provision of transcripts and text alternatives, and embedded support and regular opportunities for feedback.

Our CloudFirst CloudDeakin templates feature built-in accessibility requirements, such as appropriate colour contrast and structured headings. Incorporating this into the learning design process supports teaching staff to create inclusive, accessible learning experiences from the very beginning, creating better experiences for students and reducing the need to retrofit alternatives later.

This approach generated lots of enthusiastic discussion and positive feedback from the audience, with one audience member commenting, ‘this is terrific – Deakin leading in so many ways!’.

The plenary sessions, from Prof. Simon Marginson, Dr Jennifer Keup, Prof. Mark Brown and our own former VC, Emeritus Prof. Jane den Hollander AO, and student panel prompted us to reflect on what we’re here for and what we want to achieve, both through our individual and institutional practices and as a sector; a call to draw on the lessons of the last 18 months to create a better future for our students, our universities and our society.

Overall, the conference was a welcome opportunity to reconnect with colleagues across higher education to reflect, both on the past 18 months and on our vision for the future. You can access papers and read the full conference proceedings on the STARS website.

If you would like to learn how to use the CloudFirst templates and design inclusive and accessible unit sites, Deakin staff can enrol to access our self-paced resources via the CloudFirst website.

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