Using online simulations to support the development of student leadership skills

Using online simulations to support the development of student leadership skills

Using online simulations to support the development of student leadership skills

10

FEBRUARY, 2021

Teaching Online
Good Practice

In their final unit, students in the Graduate Certificate of Humanitarian Leadership engage in an intensive five-day simulation of a real-world humanitarian situation which gives them the opportunity to demonstrate leadership behaviours and apply appropriate humanitarian strategies to existing and emerging humanitarian contexts. Students take on roles within the senior leadership team of an NGO while academic staff impersonate characters that NGO members would typically interact with in the course of their work.

Reimagining an intensive unit

In 2020, Associate Professor Phil Connors, a founder of the course, worked with the DLF faculty pod for Arts & Education to reimagine the simulation in an online environment. During the five days of the online simulation, students commenced with a structured small group session, the Action Learning Sets, to explore challenges and identify solutions to a given problem. This would be followed by four to five hours of the actual simulation incorporating a rapid team review (RTR) session facilitated by coaches. The simulation activity was wrapped up on day five with a series of debrief sessions and feedback from peers.

During the simulation period, students and their coaches used Microsoft Teams for meetings, debriefs and peer feedback sessions. Academic staff members shared insights and collaborated throughout the simulation in a private, staff-only, channel within the Microsoft Teams environment. They also recorded their observations of student leadership behaviours directly from within the Microsoft Teams space using a third-party app. Breakout rooms in Zoom were used to carry out an individual assessment activity where students gave a presentation to a high value donor (HVD) on their organisation’s crisis response strategy.

The benefits for students

Simulations bring about multiple benefits to the learners, including the opportunity to apply theory to real-life situations, which improves learning, engagement and enjoyment of the course.  While the main purpose of the simulation was to develop students’ leadership skills, they also had the chance to cultivate a range of other skills such as decision-making, problem-solving and effective communication.

Learn more about delivering online simulations

In this video, Assoc. Prof. Connors talks to Isma Seetal about the unit and the online simulation.  He also gives us a tour of the Microsoft Teams site that was created for the simulation.

 

 

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CloudDeakin user access during T3 examination period

CloudDeakin user access during T3 examination period

CloudDeakin user access during T3 examination period  

05

FEBRUARY, 2021

Teaching Online
Good Practice

To allow us to protect the integrity of exams, we will be restricting user access to CloudDeakin for the two-week exam period. As per T1 and T2 2020, the below decisions were made and endorsed by the DVCE, PVC T&L and ADTLs in consultation with Faculty T&L support teams. These changes, and the underlying rationale, are outlined below.

Why are we doing this?

A lot of people have various forms of access to CloudDeakin. To help maintain the security of exam replacement tasks, access will be restricted during the exam period. Only Unit Chairs, Associate Deans Teaching and Learning, Associate Heads of School and key CloudDeakin support staff in faculties and eSolutions will have access to CloudDeakin during this period. Students will maintain access to their unit sites but will not be able to view their exam replacement tasks until the scheduled exam timeslot.

Which roles will be affected?

The changes will be implemented slightly differently in each faculty to accommodate faculty processes. The table below shows which roles will be removed from unit sites in each faculty at the start of the exam period and reinstated at the end of the two-week period.

Roles to be removed from unit sites on Monday 8 February
Business and Law Tutor, Marker, Marking Tutor, Auditor (excluding ADTLs), Librarian, Learning Support
SEBE Tutor, Marker, Marking Tutor, Auditor (excluding ADTLs), Librarian, Learning Support
Health Auditor, Librarian, Learning Support, Visitor (excluding API team), Participant
Arts and Education No changes

When will access be removed?

The affected roles will be removed on Monday 8 February by 9am. The roles will be reinstated on Monday 22 February by 9am. Unit chairs and Faculty CloudDeakin support teams will be able to re-enrol staff (e.g. Markers, Tutors, Marking Tutors) in the unit site once the assessment has completed if this access is required before Monday 22 February.

Who to contact for further details?

ArtsEd Digital Learning: artsed-digital-learning@deakin.edu.au

BL Learning Innovations Support: bl-learninginnovations@deakin.edu.au

Health: hedu@deakin.edu.au

SEBE: sebe-clouddeakinsupport@deakin.edu.au

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Redesigning FutureLearn units to promote active learning

Redesigning FutureLearn units to promote active learning

Redesigning FutureLearn units to promote active learning

22

JANUARY, 2021

Teaching Online
Good Practice

Two FutureLearn delivered units were recently redesigned to place an even greater emphasis on active learning. Leadership Practice with Impact (MPL700) and Leadership Challenges (MPL701) have been delivered fully online using the FutureLearn platform as part of the Master of Leadership, one of Deakin’s suite of Professional Practice Degrees.

Dr Melissa Parris (Senior Lecturer, Deakin Business School) and Jenny Pesina (Senior Educational Developer, Global Studio) led a team of staff from across the Deakin Business School and Global Studio to restructure the units and review the various student learning activities included in the ‘Your tasks’ section. The team completed the redesign while working remotely, using the online visual collaboration platform Miro to initiate a rigorous design process and collaborating using Microsoft Teams.

The ‘Your task’ section

The ‘Your tasks’ section included in Deakin’s FutureLearn courses is where a student will find activities designed to deepen their understanding of the unit. The ‘Your task’ section of MPL700 and MPL701 has now been re-designed to further promote active learning through reflection and conversation. Activities have been mapped across two main categories: ‘Reflective practice’ and ‘Share your ideas’.

The purpose of ‘Reflective practice’ activities is to invite self-reflection on what has been learnt so far through asking a question or describing a scenario. These tasks also assist with student preparation for the assessment, where students commonly draw on their own experiences to demonstrate their learning.

‘We know that reflective practice is integral to deep learning, encouraging students to think critically about both their own experiences and the theory they are learning’, said Dr Melissa Parris. ‘It is one of the skills we want to encourage for lifelong learning beyond these units. One well-known author on leadership, Professor Warren Bennis, also emphasised the importance of reflection for leadership practice:

Experiences aren’t truly yours until you think about them, analyse them, examine them, question them, reflect on them, and finally understand them. The point … is to use your experiences rather than be used by them … (Bennis 2009, p.92)

‘Share your ideas’ invites students to join in a discussion with peers by commenting and responding to the existing discussion threads. This provides an extra dimension to self-reflection, allowing the students to engage in a collaborative discussion on challenging concepts and problem solving.

‘In the largely self-paced learning environment on FutureLearn, the ‘Share your ideas’ activities are key to active and collaborative learning’, said Dr Parris. ‘These activities can cover current and/or provocative issues and allow students to collaboratively consider different options and the implications for different contexts.’

From the educators’ perspective, this new structure provides a more focused approach to online moderation and student support mechanisms. The range of ‘Share your ideas’ activities means educators have the opportunity to check student understanding of the content and provide further clarification where needed, encourage critical discussion, and propose extension questions for those seeking more knowledge.

 

Bennis, W. (2009). On becoming a leader: The leadership classic–updated and expanded. Basic Books.

Deakin staff can learn more by visiting the Global Studio SharePoint site.

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Transition Pedagogy or panic-gogy: The first year experience of emergency remote teaching

Transition Pedagogy or panic-gogy: The first year experience of emergency remote teaching

Transition pedagogy or panic-gogy: The first year experience of emergency remote teaching

10

DECEMBER, 2020

Inclusive Education
Teaching Online
Good Practice

In early December Professor Sally Kift presented a talk at Deakin’s Inclusive Education Community of Practice about the first year experience of emergency remote teaching due to COVID-19. In her talk Professor Kift ranged widely across data, research and good practice frameworks to articulate what we needed most to learn from our experiences in 2020.

Acknowledging the ‘pedagogy of kindness’ that students had acknowledged gratefully in their surveys at Deakin and elsewhere this year, she developed further the theme of fostering strong relationships between students, and between students and staff, as a foundation for learning, mental wellbeing and ongoing connection with university.

She noted the strong 2020 student success and retention figures at Deakin, including for several equity groups, and pointed to our pre-existing foundations for quality online and inclusive education, quoting at length from the Inclusive Education and Division of Student Life (DSL) student support websites, and even our Unit Minimum Standards. She also acknowledged CRADLE’s leading contribution to contemporary assessment research, in particular around online assessment.

She revisited the Transition Pedagogy she pioneered, drawing on recent research and good practice at a range of universities to demonstrate the ongoing usefulness of this framework as a way to organise the multitude of considerations that are necessary to support diverse students into university. These examples showed fresh ways of thinking, such as fostering autonomy through developing assessment literacy, using interactive planners to help students to organise their time, and taking a whole of institution approach to supporting students’ mental health.

She reflected that students commencing university in wholly online mode were coping with an even greater cognitive load:

They are learning content and skills, and they’re learning the platform, and they are learning how to learn online, and how to manage the first year transitions, and for many they are managing their mental wellbeing. Acknowledge the importance of wellbeing, talk about it!

She also noted that students entering university in 2021 ‘could be a fragile, vulnerable cohort who have just got through’, and it will be doubly important to avoid assuming entry knowledge, skills and capabilities:

If anything has become so abundantly clear out of the pandemic for all of us and for the students who are coming in in 2020-21, it is the reality of digital poverty. And that the burden has not fallen equally.

Academic and professional staff should find much in the recording of Professor Kift’s talk to enrich and refresh their thinking as they move through Trimester 3 or into Trimester 1, 2021, about how to teach and support students well online or on campus.

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Improving Data Management processes in CloudDeakin

Improving Data Management processes in CloudDeakin

Improving Data Management processes in CloudDeakin

25

NOVEMBER, 2020

Digital Innovation
Good Practice

In July this year, CloudDeakin unit sites were upgraded to the cloud-hosted Brightspace by D2L. Now, all unit and learning sites are stored in the cloud, ensuring that content is always up-to-date and providing access to the latest features and tools for delivering engaging learning experiences.

The next step in this process is to implement good Data Management practices by archiving any unused content on unit sites that is older than seven years. Archiving of information will commence in December 2020 and will be managed by DLF with support from eSolutions.

Once unit sites are six years old, they will be set to ‘inactive’, which means that students and staff will no longer be able to access content on those sites. The student experience of accessing unit sites will not be adversely affected during the archive process. Students will see a message on the front page of the sites that are getting close to expiration, encouraging them to back-up any material they need from these sites.

Teaching staff and learning content developers don’t need to take any additional actions in the archival process. News items will be posted on unit sites when they are close to the expiration date and once a unit site is inactive, staff will have 12 months to back up any content they need before the unit site is archived.

These improvements to Data Management processes will both increase efficiency in managing unit site content and improve the student experience as content is reviewed and refreshed regularly. For more information and support in the archiving process, staff can speak to their Faculty Support teams and students can contact IT Help.

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Our first virtual Learning and Teaching Conference

Our first virtual Learning and Teaching Conference

Our first virtual Learning and Teaching Conference

25

NOVEMBER, 2020

Digital Innovation
Good Practice
Teaching Online

The 2020 Learning and Teaching Virtual Conference ran from 16 to 20 November with the theme, ‘Critical conversations, challenges and celebrations’.

For the first time ever, this year’s conference was delivered entirely online, through Zoom sessions, virtual tours of learning spaces and an MS Teams channel that staff could use to connect. Those that attended could also access virtual posters, videos, podcasts and a Padlet wall for shared reflections.

With over 300 registrations, this was one of the biggest learning and teaching conferences that Deakin has ever held. Each of the sessions was highly attended by both Deakin staff and students.

The conference opened with a keynote address from Professor Liz Johnson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor Education, sharing the pillars of the Education and Employability plan – What will I learn? How will I learn? How will I be supported? There was also a reminder that students are at the heart of everything we do.

Student led sessions

This year’s conference saw more Deakin student participation than ever before. Students shared their experiences of learning from home, inclusive design, authenticity, starting first-year during COVID-19, peer support and the Deakin Launch Network.

Touring virtual learning spaces

Attendees had the chance to experience other units and learning environments through virtual tours.

Amanda Edgar, Ryan Wood-Bradley and James Armitage presented a tour of the virtual optometry clinic. The tour showcased how H5P, facilitators and problem based learning came together to support first year optometry students to develop complex clinical skills such as communication, clinical decision making, teamwork, patient centred care and evidence-based practice.

There were also presentations and papers exploring online tours of construction management sites, simulations in midwifery, the virtual architecture design studio, and virtual tele-health.

Learning through narrative and storytelling

Many of the sessions explored the theme of narrative and storytelling and how it can raise the level of student engagement in teaching and learning. Dr Kerri Morgan’s session ‘Choose your own adventure – exploring mathematics another way ‘explored how gamification could be used to support students, who traverse a setting of Ancient civilisations on a quest to find a number of mathematical artefacts.

The human library

Attendees could also borrow from the human library, a collection of Deakin experts who were on loan for a one-on-one conversations during the conference. The ‘human books’ available in the library covered a diverse range of learning and teaching subjects, such as cheating and assessment security, managing online communities, leadership in learning and teaching and the importance of equity during COVID-19. The human library was very successful, with limited availability filling up within 24 hours of opening.

Access recordings and resources

Deakin staff members can view recordings of sessions and access virtual posters, videos and podcasts on the 2020 Learning and Teaching Virtual Conference webpage as they are uploaded across the rest of this week. To access recordings, visit the conference program and select a session.

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