Explore our new Teaching and Learning Induction Portal

Explore our new Teaching and Learning Induction Portal

Explore our new Teaching and Learning Induction Portal

17

SEPTEMBER, 2020

Teaching and Learning
Induction Portal
Good Practice

We’re excited to announce that the Deakin Learning Futures Teaching and Learning Induction Portal is now accessible on DeakinHub.

This resource was developed collaboratively through a joint project with Human Resources and faculty teaching and learning leaders to complement the other layers of induction at Deakin that welcome new members to our community. Structured information is offered to assist new academic and professional staff to understand their roles in teaching and learning in the Deakin context. The resource is integrated with the new Deakin Teaching Capability Framework.

The staff journey begins with a basics page, a quick reference for finding what you need to teach at Deakin, which will be especially useful for those in new casual and short-term roles. The rest of the portal offers timely and targeted access to a range of curated resources and supports. Information on key topics is offered, like tips on teaching a first class, assessment, growing your career, student engagement and retention, academic integrity, the CloudFirst approach and more. New staff can access information on gettting started at Deakin, and they are also invited to return and see what’s next in their development. The Teaching and Learning Induction Portal also includes the recently launched Deakin Student Support Services Map for staff, an interactive, comprehensive resource to consult for referral of students to support, services and information.

Information is tailored for what people need to know. For example, some Unit Chairs and Course Directors teach, and others do not. Teaching and learning leaders, who are also active members of a teaching team, can access materials and resources suited to both aspects of their roles. There is specific information for other teaching team members and those in learning and teaching support roles. This includes demonstrators, learning designers, educational technologists, academic developers, Work Integrated Learning and Student Experience teams, careers staff, librarians, student support services teams and many more.

The focus of the project will now move to road-testing and refining the portal over time and to developing related synchronous supports. Please share your feedback with us using the email facility on the site! Other future directions include developing a third level of the resource where some ‘going beyond’ scenarios and case studies can be used to support the development of excellent practice in the key topic areas. We will again collaborate closely with our faculty partners on that work.

Click here to visit the Deakin Learning Futures Teaching and Learning Induction Portal.

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Supporting staff to support our students

Supporting staff to support our students

Supporting staff to support our students

17

SEPTEMBER, 2020

Teaching & Learning
Student Support
Staff Support

Academic or professional staff are often the first port of call when a student needs help. These issues may not be study-related. A student may also come to you when they’re struggling with personal difficulties – from relationship problems to mental health issues. In situations that aren’t related to your area of expertise, it can be hard to know how, or even if, to help the student and where to direct them for professional help.

This is why the Student Support and Referral portal was developed. Launched earlier this year, the portal is part of our ongoing commitment to prioritising the health and wellbeing of our entire University community. The COVID-19 pandemic has made it even more important to know how to direct students to the most appropriate kind of assistance. The challenge of dealing with stay-at-home restrictions, online study, and difficult financial, emotional and personal circumstances is affecting a large number of the Deakin community.

If you haven’t already done so, we encourage you to explore this online resource, which gathers together a range of important information, including:

  • How to deal with a student emergency or a student in distress.
  • Direct referral paths to priority services, including sexual harm, problem student behaviour, counselling and psychological support, medical services, international student support, multiple or complex student needs, disability support, student misconduct and complaints.
  • Advice on what services are available and how students can access them.
  • Links to helpful tools, apps articles and resources that help students to manage their own needs, where appropriate.

You can access the Student Support and Referral portal directly or find it in the new DeakinHub intranet under Support and services > Supporting students > Helping students in distress. We encourage you to bookmark it for future use.

Online resources for students

Student Wellbeing Liaison Service

The Student Wellbeing Liaisons support staff to de-escalate student distress and identify their support needs. In some cases, they will assess a student for any further health and wellbeing needs, and provide appropriate support and referral options. The service is located within the Health and Wellbeing Centres and is available to support staff via phone.

If you’re supporting a student in distress and require further advice and support – but it is not an emergency situation – contact the Student Wellbeing Liaisons on 9244 5970. Referrals will be prioritised based on the level of urgency.

What to do when you suspect there may be a missing student

On occasion students may have unexpected absences or may be thought to be missing. University staff members may become aware of this directly or through communication via a student’s friends, family members, overseas agents, outside organisations or emergency services. All missing student concerns should be taken seriously and escalated to immediately. To support staff in responding to concerns or reports of missing students enrolled at Deakin, we have developed Responding to Reports of Missing Students Guidelines.

Safer Community will provide initial advice and support to staff and external referrers in relation to matters involving missing students and are available for consultation Monday to Friday, 9am to 4pm on 9244 3734 or email safercommunity@deakin.edu.au.

In addition to being available via a search of the Deakin Policy Library, the guidelines can also be accessed via the Student Support and Referral Portal or download the PDF.

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Join the ePortfolio Australia Forum 2020 and find out more about using portfolios in teaching and learning

Join the ePortfolio Australia Forum 2020 and find out more about using portfolios in teaching and learning

Join the ePortfolio Australia Forum 2020 and find out more about using portfolios in teaching and learning

17

SEPTEMBER, 2020

Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning
Learning Innovations

The 2020 ePortfolio Australia Forum will be virtually hosted by Deakin University with the theme of ‘Digital Identity – Ethics and Experience’. 

Portfolios are curated collections of artefacts that showcase student learning, capabilities, experiences and professional identity. They allow students to demonstrate achievement, learning and development across their learning experience and career. Not only do portfolios allow students to showcase these achievements and their developing professional identity to potential employers, they also help students identify their own learning and areas for further development. Using portfolios across courses can assist students in creating connections between units and help them see how their learning experiences are linked to their desired career.

Two fabulous keynote speakers have been secured for the 2020 ePortfolio Australia forum. On Day 1, Inger Mewburn Associate Professor Inger Mewburn, Director of Research Training, ANU aka The Thesis Whisperer will draw on her extensive personal experiences on social media and how this practice helps to create digital footprints to deliver ‘How I learned to relax and love Linkedin’.

In contrast, on Day 2 Jeanette Cheah Jeanette Cheah, CEO and Founder at Hacker Exchange will draw on her insights from working with thousands of student entrepreneurs to give an eclectic address on ‘Entrepreneurship: The Ultimate Digital Identity’.

Join ePortfolio enthusiasts around the country on 29 and 30 October, 2020 to participate in a diverse mix of workshops, graduate and student panels, networking, collegial discussions and sharing of latest updates on ePortfolios.

For more information visit 2020 ePortfolio Australia Forum Online.

Deakin University is currently evaluating major ePortfolio platforms (Pebblepad and Portfolium) and are working with faculties to embed ePortfolio thinking and activities in courses and units. For more information and embedding Portfolios in your course, please visit DTeach Portfolio

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Collaboration and sharing at the heart of Course Directors Day

Collaboration and sharing at the heart of Course Directors Day

Collaboration and sharing at the heart of Course Directors Day
AUGUST, 2020
Digital Learning Teaching & Learning Learning Innovations Team Collaboration

The recent Course Directors Day, held on Tuesday 18 August, provided a timely reminder that moving online is no barrier to collaboration, sharing and connection. In her introduction to the draft Education and Employability Guiding Plan, Professor Liz Johnson highlighted the great work many staff are already doing in digital learning and innovation, by inviting three teaching teams to share their approaches to teaching practical classes online. Olivia Millard and Misha Myers (School of Communications and Creative Arts) shared some of the creative solutions used to teach creative arts online, to help students develop their performance skills, and share and receive peer feedback on their work. Madeline Schultz (School of Life and Environmental Science) discussed how her team designed Kitchen Chemistry, using readily available ingredients and basic kitchen equipment to help students develop their lab and calculation skills and explore concepts like solubility and heat capacity. Clint Miller (School of Exercise and Nutrition Science) shared how a campus clinic was redeveloped into telehealth consultations so students could continue to work with clients and apply their knowledge to real cases. In sharing their work, the teams didn’t shy away from acknowledging the challenges involved – ensuring students could easily access materials, or the privacy challenge of seeing into students’ homes, for example – but shared practical solutions for addressing these.

This sharing of experiences continued with a panel on online group work, featuring students Larissa Wright and Tegbir Singh, alongside Bardo Fraunholz (Business School) and Berni Murphy (School of Health and Social Development). Larissa and Tegbir acknowledged that group work, especially online group work, is not always a winner with students but that, done right, it can lead to valuable learning experiences and lasting friendships. Larissa and Tegbir’s tips for group work included teaching teamwork skills explicitly, creating student groups, providing guidance and suggestions on how to work as a team (including assigned roles) and ensuring accountability. Bardo and Berni echoed and added to these, emphasising the importance of teaching teamwork and creating groups that are diverse and balanced. The insights and suggestions weren’t limited to panellists, of course, with the ideas and reflections shared in the chat highlighting a benefit of Zoom. Audience recommendations included using FeedbackFruits for self- and peer-assessment on teamwork, asking students to share ‘how best to work with me’ and the use of both individual and group milestone tasks.

In a time when many of us may be feeling isolated and perhaps overwhelmed, the Course Directors Day was a welcome reminder of the joy and value of connecting with colleagues to share challenges, ideas and insights, and of the tremendous commitment and generosity of those colleagues to supporting each other and our students.

To share your own experiences of, and insights from, teaching online in 2020 with colleagues, please post them on the Course Directors Webinar Padlet wall.

For more on facilitating online teamwork, see our top tips or check out the collaborative learning materials on DTeach.

For more stories and ideas about teaching online, subscribe to our new podcast, Tales of Teaching Online.

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New Induction Resource for Teaching & Learning Staff: Deakin Student Support Services Map

New Induction Resource for Teaching & Learning Staff: Deakin Student Support Services Map

New Induction Resource for Teaching & Learning Staff: Deakin Student Support Services Map
AUGUST, 2020

Induction, Supporting Staff

Deakin Learning Futures is excited to announce the launch of a comprehensive and interactive map to help guide staff as they refer students who are seeking help. This is part of a much larger SharePoint site focused on induction support for teaching and learning which will be launched in its entirety very soon to assist new academic and professional staff to understand their teaching and learning roles in the Deakin context.

Many ‘layers’ of induction welcome those new to teaching and learning related roles at Deakin university. Human Resources, faculties and schools all contribute to introducing new people to our university and to how we do teaching and learning. It is exciting to report that the Deakin Learning Futures ‘One Deakin’ induction project, which also contributes to these efforts, has reached a big milestone this month.

Deakin has a very comprehensive ecosystem of student supports, including transition focused supports like orientation, assistance to develop key skills (like academic and library skills), health and wellbeing services, efforts to create a safer community and access to financial and legal help. There are guides to leveraging and responding to student diversity, promoting equity, managing crises, meeting international students’ need. There are related guidelines for staff, such as those on responding to challenging student behaviors’.

That is why this interactive, comprehensive ‘map’ of where to refer help seeking students and why, as well as to related staff-facing services, will be of use to recently appointed teaching academics and professional and academic staff in teaching and learning related roles in particular. Deakin’s rich resources can take some time to discover, without a quick guide. The map is a result of much consultation, review and hard work. It is also a ‘living’ resource that will be refreshed over time. Each page features an ‘email’ button to provide feedback, or make suggestions, which we hope that you will do when you visit it.

To promote staff to access particular supports when they are most needed, the map has a ‘timeline’ structure. You can browse what is likely to be of use over weeks 0-3 of a first trimester at Deakin. Those first few weeks are a busy time of learning about your school and faculty. Familiarity with University-wide support services for students will also be very beneficial. By weeks 6 -11, there may be time to start gaining a deeper understanding of the Deakin approach to promoting student and staff health, wellbeing and success. The second Trimester is often a time to start partnering with expert others who can assist you further.

The Deakin Student Support Services Map is part of a much larger sharepoint site focused on induction support for teaching and learning, which will be launched in its entirety very soon. It will assist new academic and professional staff to understand their teaching and learning roles in the Deakin context, including the Deakin Teaching Capability Framework. It is organised partly by key topics, which include: teaching a first class, teaching@Deakin, assessment for learning, career growth through evaluation and review, academic integrity, cloud first design and delivery and student engagement and retention.

Click here to visit the Deakin Student Support Services Map.

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Teaching and curriculum design to support mental wellbeing

Teaching and curriculum design to support mental wellbeing

Teaching and curriculum design to support mental wellbeing
AUGUST, 2020
Digital Learning Teaching & Learning Learning Innovations Team Collaboration
More than 100 Deakin staff listened to a Deakin staff and student panel discussion on ‘Teaching and curriculum design to support mental wellbeing’ in early August. This Inclusive Education Community of Practice event was well timed as Victoria went into lockdown again. The panel, moderated by Dean of Students Lisa Hanna, included:

  • Karen Stuart, Manager Counselling & Psychological Support Services—on the Deakin Student Mental Health & Wellbeing Strategy and what teaching and professional staff can do to help implement this
  • Kiernan Cleary, DUSA President—on his own experience and wider perspective of students’ mental health stresses, particularly at the moment
  • Sally Buchanan-Hagen, Lecturer in Nursing—giving a ‘consumer advocate’ perspective of mental health and wellbeing as a student and staff member
  • Tegan Whitten, DUSA Accessibility and Services Representative, Geelong—on her lived experience of mental health conditions and ways curriculum and teaching strategies help her to manage
  • Susie Macfarlane, Senior Lecturer, DLF Health Pod Manager—on curriculum design and teaching practice to support mental health and wellbeing.

 

Karen Stuart started by introducing the new Deakin Mental Health and Wellbeing Strategy, outlining its whole-of-university, inclusive, proactive, evidence-based and student-centred approach and implementation plan. She also gave her perspective as a counsellor on the increasing mental health risks students are coping with under COVID-19 conditions.

Attendees heard moving accounts from the two students on the difficulties they and other students face, with or without pre-existing mental health conditions. The students, both DUSA executives, didn’t miss this opportunity to explain how teachers’ choices over curriculum could make a huge difference to their ability to cope and thrive.

Sally Buchanan-Hagen gave an equally moving and instructive account of her experience of significant mental health problems when she was a student. She explained how that experience now guides her practice as a Nursing lecturer.

Susie Macfarlane was the last speaker, drawing on her research as a psychologist and more recently as an academic and Deakin Learning Futures Health pod leader to provide a range of tips and strategies spanning inclusive curriculum, assessment, feedback and teamwork.

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