Create a do-it-yourself online unit site with CloudFirst 103

Create a do-it-yourself online unit site with CloudFirst 103

Create a do-it-yourself online unit site with CloudFirst 103

16

November, 2020

CloudFirst
Teaching Online
Good Practice
Digital Innovations

How do you build a CloudFirst unit site? We’ve launched CloudFirst 103, a guide for academic staff that outlines how they can build a do-it-yourself CloudFirst unit site. CloudFirst 103 provides the knowledge needed to work through the three stages of unit development: high-level mapping, learning activity design, and content production of a range of different types of learning resources including videos, podcasts, images and interactives. Academic staff can also access a series of activities outlining the steps required to develop everything needed for a do-it-yourself CloudFirst unit.

CloudFirst 103 is designed so that academics can use it the way that best suits them. Topics can be worked through in a linear sequence to create a DIY CloudFirst unit, or dipped into to build expertise in a specific area of interest, such as video production, H5P interactives or embedded discussions.

Many topics also include an advanced section for those already skilled in that area, or those returning on another CloudFirst transformation that want to take their design skills to the next level.

Deakin staff can join CloudFirst 103 and get started creating their own online units.

CloudFirst 103 builds on the information in the CloudFirst 101 and CloudFirst 102 resources, which guide academics through the CloudFirst learning principles and approach to curriculum design and showcase practical strategies for teaching online from academics running CloudFirst units.

The CloudFirst team

The CloudFirst team was established in late 2017 to transform learning design at Deakin and create premium online exemplars.

The team has worked with over 100 contributors including academics, faculty support staff, librarians, students and external consultants to develop over 600,000 words, 800 videos, 500 images and 400 interactive objects to support student learning across a range of disciplines, including Business, Law, Education and Mathematics. Since the launch of CloudFirst, there have been 16,000 enrolments in CloudFirst units across 5000 students.

The CloudFirst team continues to work on course transformation across all faculties at Deakin and has been ramping up capability building through online training and live workshops, both as a response to academics wanting to progress their own CloudFirst journeys, and the need to transition learning online due to COVID-19.

CloudFirst 103 represents the biggest instructional undertaking of the CloudFirst team to date. To create CloudFirst103 the team refined all their processes, templates, instructions and development tools, including only what’s necessary to achieve a quality DIY CloudFirst unit.

Whether progressing through CloudFirt 103 individually or as part of a teaching team, we are excited to see how academics interact with the resource and to showcase the results of DIY CloudFirst transformations.

Visit the CloudFirst website to learn more.

Want new articles before they get published? Subscribe to our DTeach Newsletter.

Register your interest in attending a CloudDeakin UX workshop

Register your interest in attending a CloudDeakin UX workshop

Register your interest in attending a CloudDeakin UX workshop

21

OCTOBER, 2020

Digital Innovation
Good Practice
Teaching Online

We are seeking expressions of interest from academic staff who have experience with creating, maintaining and using unit sites, and in particular those who may be new to teaching with CloudDeakin. Workshop sessions will last 1.5 hours and will be conducted via Zoom from 4 to 6 November, facilitated by our Deakin UX specialists. Participation is limited and will be representative across all faculties and roles. Acceptance will be confirmed via email.

In response to COVID-19, academic staff have put a massive amount of effort into the rapid transition to online teaching and learning. This change has urged us to use our tools and environments in new ways to design and deliver information, resources and learning for students. This presents us with an opportunity to review how current practice has been impacted by the rapid transition, and to evaluate how our methods meet the needs of our students and staff in the long term.

This review will follow a structured approach based on UX fundamentals to gather feedback and personal experiences from academic staff and students. The information will be drawn together with specialist UX evaluations and other sources of data to inform a set of recommendations for refinements to our minimum standards (refer clauses 66-68) and practices.

Register your interest  in participating.

What is UX?

User Experience or UX design is a commitment to building products (or services) that are created with the person in mind. It starts with studying who the customers are and what they need and taking that information to provide products and services that improve the experience people have when using a system or service. Learn more at our UX Digital Centre of Excellence.

Register your interest in attending a Virtual UX Workshop for academic staff.

Want new articles before they get published? Subscribe to our DTeach Newsletter.

Explore the SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase

Explore the SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase

Explore the SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase

20

OCTOBER, 2020

Digital Innovation
Teaching and Learning
Good Practice

The SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase was created to give teaching staff from the Faculty of Science, Engineering and the Built Environment (SEBE) the opportunity to share examples of good practice with their colleagues.

Created by the SEBE Deakin Learning Futures (DLF) faculty pod, the showcase includes videos made by SEBE faculty members providing inspiring examples of teaching and learning practices, and is open to all SEBE staff. The videos were developed with five questions in mind:

  1. Context:  What is the teaching context of the example?
  2. Need for change: What prompted you to make the changes?
  3. Innovation: What did you do and how did you learn to do it?
  4. Evaluation: Where you happy with the result and what was the feedback?
  5. Advice: What advice would you give to others who might want to try something similar?

Due to the transition to online teaching in response to COVID-19 the showcase has a particular focus on digital learning, from tours of unit site design to run-throughs of innovative assessment tasks. Staff can watch short summaries of how their colleagues have overcome the challenges of teaching online and access practical tips on how to incorporate different methods into their own teaching practice.

 

Watch a SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase video

We’ve put together some of our favourite examples from the showcase for you to explore.

Live streaming lectures

Damien Callahan and Madeleine Schultz discuss how they used livestreamed lectures in SLE133: Chemistry in Our World to increase student engagement and interaction. When students log into the livestream lecture, they can see a screen with text/images and also the document camera screen. They can participate in live polls and communicate via the chat.

Virtual fieldtrip

Prue Francis showcases an innovative solution to adapting a field trip exercise in her first year Marine Environments unit. Students would normally conduct a sampling exercise of a marine rocky shore at Barwon Heads Marine Sanctuary using 1m x 1m quadrats and transect lines. A coding sequence was used to allocate a personalised ‘virtual quadrat’ to each student. Prue used videos and H5P activities to build students’ ability to identify the species present.

Using Padlet to simulate the studio experience

Michael Sharman describes how the design studio experience for students in the Bachelor of Design Architecture was enabled online using a combination Padlet and Zoom. Padlet is a Deakin-supported web-based platform that works as a space for students to post their design work. Combined with annotation tools in Zoom, students were able to comment on each other’s work and staff were able to provide feedback as students’ projects progressed.

The SEBE Teaching and Learning Showcase is now open to all SEBE staff through CloudDeakin.

Want new articles before they get published? Subscribe to our DTeach Newsletter.

Deakin Library Digital Demos and XR explorations

Deakin Library Digital Demos and XR explorations

Deakin Library Digital Demos and XR explorations

20

OCTOBER, 2020

Digital Innovation
Deakin Library

How do you translate the digital affordances of extended reality (XR) into teaching practice and student engagement? Digital innovation in the XR space is fast-paced, complex and wide-ranging. XR for education ranges along a continuum and can include Virtual Reality (VR), 360-degree video, 3D objects or Augmented Reality.

In August, a QUT colleague Sarah Howard delivered a Library Digital Demo that explored this continuum and touched on a multitude of platforms – both freely available or at a cost – using mobile devices and low cost or expensive hardware. In presenting on XR explorations within the library and academic sector, Sarah deliberately designed her content to work in VR. Whether you have a compatible VR headset or not, you can check out Sarah’s interactive presentation on Thinglink. Alternatively, you could watch the recording of the session below.

Deakin Library and XR

With students unable to explore library spaces in person during COVID-19 restrictions, we wanted to shape a digital experience that provided students with an opportunity to explore and connect. We harnessed 360-degree photography and h5p functionality to create interactive virtual tours of three Deakin Library spaces. Each tour allows you to drag your cursor to explore the area, use arrows to navigate around the library, and select hotspots to learn more information about our services and resources.

The library also offers collections which curate XR resources for teaching and learning. Good examples of this are Visible Body, which is a virtual anatomy app that presents the body in 3D form, with users able to hide structures or other layers to see what lies beneath. Anatomy TV has a similar 3D graphical approach to the body for users to explore.

Join a Deakin Library Digital demo

Once a month, a library staff member or guest presenter runs a brief online workshop featuring a new digital tool. The sessions are open to all Deakin staff and academics. It’s a great way to find out about your colleagues’ favourite digital tools and secret workflow hacks, without taking up too much time! Visit the library internal events page to learn more about upcoming Digital Demos or watch for updates in the monthly Network newsletter.

We’re always looking for ideas for future Digital Demos. If you use an online tool or resource that you’re passionate about and would be interested in sharing it with your colleagues, please get in touch with us at digital-demos@deakin.edu.au.

Want new articles before they get published? Subscribe to our DTeach Newsletter.

Find the right tool for the job with the Digital Learning Environments Guide

Find the right tool for the job with the Digital Learning Environments Guide

Find the right tool for the job with the Digital Learning Environments Guide

16

OCTOBER, 2020

Teaching Online
Digital Innovation

Deakin staff and students have access to a multitude of online platforms and tools to support teaching and learning – so which is the best one to use? Well, that really depends on what you are trying to achieve.

We know that it can be difficult to decide what technologies are best suited to your unit, so we’ve created a new resource to help you with these decisions. The Digital Learning Environments Guide provides information about all of the teaching and learning platforms and tools supported by Deakin.

The guide groups platforms and tools by purpose: whether you want students to acquire knowledge; undertake research and inquiry; work collaboratively; engage in discussion; produce their own artefacts; or evidence their learning through assessment (e.g. Laurillard, 2002). For each tool, we’ve also included examples of how this can be used by teaching teams and students, and linked to additional resources.

Some tools serve multiple purposes, and facilitate different types of learning – this resource will help you identify these different uses so you can create a more integrated and streamlined learning experience for your students, and for you.

For now, the Digital Learning Environments Guide is available as an interactive PDF, but we’re working on creating an interactive webpage to make it easier for you to choose the tools that are right for you and your students.

Access the Digital Learning Environments Guide interactive PDF today and find the platforms and tools that best suit your needs.

 

References:

  • Laurillard, D. (2002). Rethinking university teaching: A conversational framework for the effective use of learning technologies (2nd ed.). London: Routledge Falmer. doi:10.4324/9780203304846
Want new articles before they get published? Subscribe to our DTeach Newsletter.

Designing and delivering digital assessment

Designing and delivering digital assessment

Designing and delivering digital assessment
06
OCTOBER, 2020
Digital Assessment
Teaching & Learning
Learning Innovations

We’ve launched a new resource to support Deakin University teaching staff designing and delivering digital assessment. With the rapid transition to fully-online learning in Trimester 1, 2020 due to COVID-19 we were required to make significant changes to Deakin University’s assessment practices. This new resource showcases some of the innovative work staff have done this year and reflects on the long-term vision for digital assessment at Deakin.

Instigated by Prof Helen Partridge (Pro Vice-Chancellor, Teaching and Learning), a working group headed by Darci Taylor (Senior Lecturer, CloudFirst Redesign) created the resource in collaboration with staff from multiple divisions and faculties across the University.

 

Combining pedagogy and technical information

The resource combines the pedagogy and technical information of how teaching staff might implement different types of digital assessments, including guidance for the rationale around their decision making and information about support teams within the faculties.

Staff can also learn more about the student experience of each type of digital assessment and read stories from colleagues about what worked well in Trimester 1, what challenges were faced, and what they might change moving forward. As we continue to deliver digital assessments for Trimester 2 and beyond, we will continue to update the resources with new information and use cases to support our teaching staff.

 

Types of digital assessment

Here’s some examples of the different types of digital assessment that can be found in the resource.

Online practical assessment

Staff can learn how students can perform a laboratory-style practical activity for an assessor live in real-time via a digital platform. They can learn how Dr Alecia Bellgrove used live Zoom sessions with slideshows of specimens and quizzes delivered through CloudDeakin to replicate lab-based practical assessment for Marine Biology.

Team based learning

Team based learning (TBL) is a highly structured teaching strategy designed to accelerate the acquisition of discipline specific knowledge and transferable skills such as communication, teamwork and critical thinking (Currey et al. 2020). Staff can learn how Prof Alex Gentle and Dr Simon Backhouse transitioned their campus-based TBL for Optometry to a fully online model using BB Collaborate with break-out rooms for individual team based discussions and InteDashboard for delivery of assessment material.

Time-restricted online assessment

Time-restricted online assessments covers a broad range of assessments. It includes written assessments or tasks that are often delivered online using the CloudDeakin ‘dropbox’ and usually have a traditional due date or strict deadline. The resource delves into how Dr Dilal Saundage’s Business Analytics students used industry specific software like WordPress and Tableau to create a data visualization artefact that they could share with future employers.​​​​​​​

To read more about these examples, or to explore the many other types of digital assessment types included in the resource, Deakin staff can access designing and delivering digital assessment on DeakinHub.

Want new articles before they get published? Subscribe to our DTeach Newsletter.