DIGITAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

WHAT IS SELF & PEER ASSESSMENT?

Self- and peer assessment (SPA) is critical to the development of evaluative judgement (Tai et al, 2018). Evaluative judgement is particularly dependent on authentic tasks and activities that ask learners to review and/or assess their own work and the work of others. This summary (Abassian, et al, 2017: 6) captures their broad characteristics: 

“The main characteristic of self-assessment is that it involves students in specifying standards and criteria to apply to their work, and determining the extent to which they have met these criteria and standards…Peer assessment includes the assessment process in which students assess the achievements, learning outcomes, and performances of their peers.”

WHY WOULD I USE SELF & PEER ASSESSMENT?

There are a number of reasons why you might design and implement SPA in your teaching and the below list outlines a summary of learning opportunities for students and teachers.

Self and peer assessment:

  • develops better judgement of their own/peers’ work against certain criteria (Boud et al 2013);
  • develops teamwork, collaboration and communication skills (Wu et al 2011);
  • develops reflective and critical thinking skills (Somervell 1993); 
  • equips students for the real work/world via authentic assessment (Boud et al 2013);
  • helps students better understand assessment criteria/rubric (Yucel et al 2014);
  • encourages students to be in the active learning mode; not always “to be assessed”, but as “assessors” (Brindley & Scoffield 1998); and
  • maintains the level of student learning without more input from staff (Boud et al 1999).

Some of the above clearly relate to Deakin University’s Graduate Learning Outcomes (GLOs)

WHAT IS SELF & PEER ASSESSMENT?

Self- and peer assessment (SPA) is critical to the development of evaluative judgement (Tai et al, 2018). Evaluative judgement is particularly dependent on authentic tasks and activities that ask learners to review and/or assess their own work and the work of others. This summary (Abassian, et al, 2017: 6) captures their broad characteristics:

“The main characteristic of self-assessment is that it involves students in specifying standards and criteria to apply to their work, and determining the extent to which they have met these criteria and standards…Peer assessment includes the assessment process in which students assess the achievements, learning outcomes, and performances of their peers.”

WHY WOULD I USE SELF & PEER ASSESSMENT?

There are a number of reasons why you might design and implement SPA in your teaching and the below list outlines a summary of learning opportunities for students and teachers.

Self and peer assessment:

  • develops better judgement of their own/peers’ work against certain criteria (Boud et al 2013);
  • develops teamwork, collaboration and communication skills (Wu et al 2011);
  • develops reflective and critical thinking skills (Somervell 1993); 
  • equips students for the real work/world via authentic assessment (Boud et al 2013);
  • helps students better understand assessment criteria/rubric (Yucel et al 2014);
  • encourages students to be in the active learning mode; not always “to be assessed”, but as “assessors” (Brindley & Scoffield 1998); and
  • maintains the level of student learning without more input from staff (Boud et al 1999).

Some of the above clearly relate to Deakin University’s Graduate Learning Outcomes (GLOs)

WHEN WOULD I USE SELF & PEER ASSESSMENT?

The following faculty use cases outline when you might use self and peer assessment in your teaching, what benefits come of using this technology, what challenges you might face and the strategies you can use to navigate these challenges.

USE CASE 1 - USING THE PEER REVIEW PLUGIN

USE CASE 2 - USING GROUP EVALUATION

An academic in the Faculty of Arts and Education had been looking for an effective technology to support peer review activities among students and was among the first to use FeedbackFruits when the pilot started in T2, 2018.

This unit situates within the School of Education where the first assessment task required students to prepare an outline for an authentic unit of work that they were either currently teaching or would be teaching in the future. Students were encouraged to participate in SPA activities to gauge and refine their knowledge of curriculum design, identify what they would do differently based on this feedback and apply peer feedback to improve their work.

The teaching team used FeedbackFruits’ ‘peer review plugin’ to facilitate this SAP activity which resulted in students and teachers having a more streamlined process for self and peer feedback to flow.

Teaching teams from the Optometry course wanted to set up a group activity whereby each group member could give and receive feedback on their input and involvement in their project work. They were looking to have students reflect on peer feedback within groups which necessitated the use of the Group Evaluation Plugin of FeedbackFruits.

Beyond the pedagogical drivers behind the activity, there were design elements required to enable a smooth and positive teaching and learning experience, including:

  • The requirement for a 24-hour deadline to give each other feedback and then a week to reflect on it.
  • The need for reviewer anonymity and teacher moderation (to monitor ‘who said what’ within a group and appropriateness of peer feedback).
  • Option to choose between a likert-scale or complex rubric.
  • The ability to create groups with different numbers of students, but a maximum of 8 members each.
  • Ability to make mandatory comment/feedback area after addressing each criterion.
  • Setting release date to follow the group presentation.

A student survey conducted in T3 2018 and T1 2019 reveal that students overall positively responded to using this tool as part of their group work and the pilot will continue in T1 2020.

 

PEER REVIEW

An academic in the Faculty of Arts and Education had been looking for an effective technology to support peer review activities among students and was among the first to use FeedbackFruits when the pilot started in T2, 2018.

This unit situates within the School of Education where the first assessment task required students to prepare an outline for an authentic unit of work that they were either currently teaching or would be teaching in the future. Students were encouraged to participate in SPA activities to gauge and refine their knowledge of curriculum design, identify what they would do differently based on this feedback and apply peer feedback to improve their work.

The teaching team used FeedbackFruits’ ‘peer review plugin’ to facilitate this SAP activity which resulted in students and teachers having a more streamlined process for self and peer feedback to flow.

TEAMWORK EVALUATION

Teaching teams from the Optometry course wanted to set up a group activity whereby each group member could give and receive feedback on their input and involvement in their project work. They were looking to have students reflect on peer feedback within groups which necessitated the use of the Group Evaluation Plugin of FeedbackFruits.

Beyond the pedagogical drivers behind the activity, there were design elements required to enable a smooth and positive teaching and learning experience, including:

  • The requirement for a 24-hour deadline to give each other feedback and then a week to reflect on it.
  • The need for reviewer anonymity and teacher moderation (to monitor ‘who said what’ within a group and appropriateness of peer feedback).
  • Option to choose between a likert-scale or complex rubric.
  • The ability to create groups with different numbers of students, but a maximum of 8 members each.
  • Ability to make mandatory comment/feedback area after addressing each criterion.
  • Setting release date to follow the group presentation.

A student survey conducted in T3 2018 and T1 2019 reveal that students overall positively responded to using this tool as part of their group work and the pilot will continue in T1 2020.

HOW DO I GET STARTED WITH SELF & PEER ASSESSMENT?

To find out more find detailed pedagogical and technical guides on our self and peer assessment resources pages by clicking the icons below.

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RESOURCES

Site References

Abbasian, G., Khezrinejad, M., and Teimourtash, M. (2017) Involving Self, Peer, and Teacher-Assessment in a Writing Course: A Cross Comparison and Reflection of Students’ Perceptions, The Journal of Applied Linguistics and Applied Literature, 5:1, 3-26.

Boud, D., Cohen, R., and Sampson, J. (1999) Peer Learning and Assessment, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 24, 413-426.

Boud, D., Dawson, P, Tai, J and Ajjawi, R. (2018) Creating an agenda for developing students’ evaluative judgement. In Boud, D, Ajjawi, R, Dawson, P and Tai, J (Eds.), Developing evaluative judgement in higher education: assessment for knowing and producing quality work (pp.186-195). London: Routledge.

Brindley, C. and Scoffield, S. (1998) Peer Assessment in Undergraduate Programmes, Teaching in Higher Education, 3:1, 79-90.

Boud, D. and Molloy, E. (2013) Rethinking models of feedback for learning: the challenge of design, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 38, 698-712.

Somervell, H. (1993) Issues in Assessment, Enterprise and Higher Education: the case for self‐peer and collaborative assessment, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 18:3, 221-233.

Yucel, R., Bird, F., Young, J. and Blanksby, T (2014) The road to self-assessment: exemplar marking before peer review develops first-year students’ capacity to judge the quality of a scientific report, Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 39:8, 971-986.

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Feedbackfruits

If you are currently creating an assignment with FeedbackFruits, did you know that you can request help, or search for answers, within the tool by clicking the Help Centre button in the lower left-hand side of the screen? 

For more information on the Help Centre click HERE. 

FACULTY
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  • Faculty of SEBE 
  • Faculty of Arts and Education 
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Technical issues

Email eSolutions: deakin@service-now.com
Phone support: 1800 463 888

Hours of support:

Monday to Friday: 8:00am – 8:00pm

Saturday to Sunday: 11:00am – 5:00pm

FEEDBACK FRUITS

If you are currently creating an assignment with FeedbackFruits, did you know that you can request help, or search for answers, within the tool by clicking the Help Centre button in the lower left-hand side of the screen? 

For more information on the Help Centre click HERE. 

FACULTY

Faculty of Business and Law

Faculty of SEBE

Faculty of Arts and Education

Faculty of Health