Acknowledgement of Country for Virtual Seminars and Meetings

Acknowledgement of Country for Virtual Seminars and Meetings

Acknowledgement of Country for Virtual Seminars and Meetings

07

MAY, 2020

Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning

Learning Innovations
Team Communication
Indigenous Pedagogies

Deakin is committed to acknowledging, building and sustaining respect and understanding between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians. Our vision is for a university that values and celebrates diversity – where all students have respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge, culture and values. At Deakin, we see this as a University-wide responsibility.

An Acknowledgement of Country recognises the traditional ownership of the lands upon which an event is held. Usually the location of the event will determine the acknowledgement used, as it will address the particular traditional owners of those lands.  Our Pro-Vice Chancellor Indigenous Strategy and Innovation, Professor Mark Rose has shared an acknowledgement of country we can use for virtual meetings.

As we gather for this meeting physically dispersed and virtually constructed let us take a moment to reflect the meaning of place and doing so recognise the various traditional lands on which we do our business today.

We acknowledge the Elders – past, present and emerging of all the land we work and live on and their Ancestral Spirits with gratitude and respect.

As an additional segment you might like to get participants to name the Nation that they are on at the moment.  This map allows you to find out who the formally recognised Traditional owners are for an area.

You can find the acknowledgements to be used for each of Deakin’s campus locations here.

More information about Deakin’s commitment to enabling all our students and staff to respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge, culture and values is available here.

For more information and updates on teaching online please refer to the Transitioning Teaching Online homepage here.

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CloudDeakin is getting an upgrade

CloudDeakin is getting an upgrade

CloudDeakin is getting an upgrade

05

MAY, 2020

Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning

Learning Innovations
D2L

We would like to let you know about an important upgrade coming to CloudDeakin in June this year.

We’ll be moving Deakin’s learning management system, CloudDeakin, to a new cloud-hosted version. Although this is a significant upgrade for the technology, it will be a small change for you.

You will have access to new features and data, and a modern learning system that will always be up-to-date. There will be small changes to the look and feel, such as some terminology updates and changes to where things are located on screen. But your content will be moved over automatically, and all your bookmarks and links will stay the same.

To allow for this upgrade, CloudDeakin will be unavailable from 5pm Friday 26th til 5pm Sunday 28th June.

Download accessible transcript here.

If you have any questions, or would like to know more, then our information sessions are for you – book here. We also have lots of information available online.

For more information and updates please refer to the Transitioning Teaching Online homepage here.

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DLF Lunchtime Series – Making connections with and between students online

DLF Lunchtime Series – Making connections with and between students online

DLF Lunchtime Series – Making connections with and between students online

30

APR, 2020

Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning

Learning Innovations
Team Communication

DLF Lunchtime series event, 28 April 2020

A panel of five Deakin educators and three students talked about strategies they had found to work well to develop learning relationships online with and between students, amidst the shift to wholly online learning and teaching during Trimester 1.

The Zoom event was hosted by A/Prof Barbie Panther and panellists were faculty first-year coordinators Dr Wendy Webber, Dionne Holland and Dr Petra Brown; teachers in Digital Media Dr Adam Brown and Emily Wade; and students Lauren Antonysen, Zara Wicks and Mia Driller.

Download accessible transcript here.

Some of the strategies raised were:

  • Phoning students who aren’t connecting: this has elicited more questions than simply inviting students to phone or email teachers. It has enabled teachers to address problems, particularly around assessments, and encouraged students to make further contact. First year students benefited especially from this strategy.
  • Posting short, friendly videos: posting a video to explain clearly how the unit is going to work online, inviting questions and explaining expectations has helped ease students into the new mode. Posting weekly short videos with encouraging memes or messages along with instructions for the week’s work has helped students know you are on top of things and able to help.
  • Buddy system: setting up a buddy system to connect more confident with quieter students has become necessary this trimester, to encourage timid students to participate.
  • Social media options: Setting up or encouraging social media such as Twitter hashtags for the unit, unit Facebook sites or Teams sites has helped students connect informally around unit work. Not all students like using unit discussion forums and email.
  • Keeping videos and mics on: asking students to keep their videos and microphones on in online seminars encourages a more natural flow of conversation and sense of an engaged community, and reduces the temptation for students to do other things during a session. Students valued this over the problems it could cause with overloaded bandwidth.
  • Showing you’re human, and trying: trying different platforms and posting videos that show your human side send a message of ‘safe failure’: that it’s ok to operate out of your comfort zone and that ‘we’re all doing our best’.
  • Designing for active online learning: units already designed for online learning are working well. These have a lot of weekly chunked content and opportunities for students to check and discuss their learning each week. Students left without direction and tasks to complete each week can tend to procrastinate over big tasks.
  • Scaffolding technologies: recognising students may not be confident on certain technologies and platforms, and supporting them to learn to use them, is vital.

For more see the detailed notes here.

For more information and updates please refer to the Transitioning Teaching Online homepage here.

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Coordinating responses: A team approach to facilitating online discussion forums

Coordinating responses: A team approach to facilitating online discussion forums

Coordinating responses: A team approach to facilitating online discussion forums

24

APR, 2020
Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning

Learning Innovations
Getting Started

Managing online discussion forums with a large group of students can seem overwhelming. Employing sustainable facilitation practices to encourage students to lead the discussions (social learning), rather than relying on the teaching team, is key.

You’ll find tips some useful tips on how to engage students in discussion, and keep conversations going, on the DTeach website.

In this guide, we’ll look at how teaching teams can coordinate facilitation of discussion forums to provide a consistent experience and make best use of your team’s time.

For more information and updates please refer to the Transitioning Teaching Online homepage here.

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Transitioning Teaching Online – Teaching with Microsoft Teams

Transitioning Teaching Online – Teaching with Microsoft Teams

Transitioning Teaching Online – Teaching with Microsoft Teams

23

APR, 2020
Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning

Learning Innovations
Getting Started

Microsoft Teams is an industry-based software that facilitates collaboration, from chat, discussion, team meetings, artefact generation, and project management. As we have transitioned teaching and learning online, we have seen a significant increase in the amount of Microsoft Teams that have been created in this space. As a result, there is a lot of information from many different sources, so we are consolidating this information in one space to support you in your implementation of Microsoft Teams for teaching and learning.

What support is currently available?

  • Weekly training sessions on using Microsoft Teams in teaching and learning for the next four weeks (see ‘Whats On?’). These will be facilitated in Microsoft Teams where you will actively experience the different functionality; to do this you will be invited to a Team the day prior to the session.
  • Student support resource has been created for you to add as a Tab in Microsoft Teams so students are aware of why they are using Teams and the different functionality within it. It also provides links to additional resources if the student requires further training.

What use cases are available for your review?

What’s next?

We understand you may be considering the use of Microsoft Teams; the staff support resource is being updated to support your design and showcase different ways in which Microsoft Teams can support collaborative learning in your unit.

Already using Microsoft Teams?

We are gathering information from Unit Chairs and teaching staff that are currently using Microsoft Teams in their teaching and learning so we can showcase the different use cases. If you would like to share your experience, please email joan.sutherland@deakin.edu.au.

For more information and updates please refer to the Transitioning Teaching Online homepage here.

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Discussion forums: Keeping the conversation going throughout trimester

Discussion forums: Keeping the conversation going throughout trimester

Transitioning Teaching Online – Discussion forums: Keeping the conversation going throughout trimester

23

APR, 2020
Digital Learning
Teaching & Learning

Learning Innovations
Getting Started

Discussion forums are important avenues for connection and learning, even more so this trimester when many students are studying online for the first time. The key to active discussion forums is ensuring that students benefit from their engagement with the discussions, clarifying and deepening their understanding and engaging with different ideas and perspectives.

We’ve previously shared tips for getting the discussion started in the first few weeks but how do you progress and extend the discussion as trimester progresses? And how do you avoid the discussion dropping off as students become more comfortable with how the unit is structured and get busy with other tasks?

In this guide we share some strategies for extending learning conversations and keeping discussion forums active and vibrant learning spaces as trimester progresses.

For tips on managing a team of discussion forum facilitators please see our guide on coordinating responses: a team approach to facilitating online discussion forums.

For more information and updates please refer to the Transitioning Teaching Online homepage here.

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