Deakin’s 2019 Learning & Teaching Conference – Teaching Differently

Deakin’s 2019 Learning & Teaching Conference – Teaching Differently

Deakin’s 2019 Learning & Teaching Conference: Teaching Differently

02

DEC, 2019

Event Recap
Teaching & Learning

Good Practice

A focus on Teaching Differently was the theme for the Deakin Learning and Teaching Conference this year. It proved to be a great framework for showcasing our colleagues’ creativity and commitment to students’ learning at Deakin.

Our keynote, Dr Naomi Winstone, presented on the shift to a dialogic form of feedback that helps students to respond more actively in order to self-regulate their learning development. Dr Winstone’s work has demonstrated that given a more personalized and formative style of feedback, students are able to act upon the academic’s suggestions in further assessment tasks.

Five streams of presentations were held concurrently from 11.15 to 4pm. These streams were grouped under ‘Teaching Differently’, Designing Differently’ ‘Assessing Differently’, ‘Digital Innovations’, ‘Working Collaboratively’ and a stream dedicated to innovative strategies to support and engage students from an inclusive perspective. Fifty, twenty-minute presentations were delivered followed by an extended panel format that included students’ voices. The ‘Elevator Pitch’ was once more a very successful format, performed perfectly by Anna O’Connell, Monique Vermeulen, Shannon Sahlqvist, Amy Sellers and Nick Hartney.

Above from left to right: staff gather downtown for the opening of the conference; Naomi Winstone delivers her keynote; and, Peter Vuong discusses teaching first year students.

Professor Liz Johnson drew the conference to a close and invited everyone to join her for networking on Level 12 where Naomi Winstone helped to launch the book The Impact of Feedback in Higher Education: Improving Assessment Outcomes for Learners, Henderson, M., Ajjawi, R., Boud, & E. Molloy (Eds). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-25112-3_1

Feedback about the conference noted the depth and breadth of this year’s program. As a result of receiving so many excellent proposals for presentations that outnumbered the venue’s capacity, a second Deakin Conference Day will be held on 25 February. So bookmark that date!

Resources

For information on our upcoming workshops, conference abstracts and presentation slides please visit the 2019 Learning & Teaching Conference website here (Deakin Staff Only).

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Good Practice in Academic Development – Transforming Digital Learning

Good Practice in Academic Development – Transforming Digital Learning

Good Practice in Academic Development – Transforming Digital Learning

02

DEC, 2019

Recognition & Award
Teaching & Learning

Digital Innovation
Collaboration

On the 6th of November the Council of Australasian University Leaders in Learning and Teaching (CAULLT) hosted the Australasian Advancing Academic Development good practice awards. The event brought together the finalists at the Queensland University of Technology to showcase and celebrate the work of teaching teams across the country.

Deakin University was represented by Director of Digital Learning, Chie Adachi, who detailed the collaborative work of the teaching team who created and taught the Transforming Digital Learning MOOC. Since its launch the short course has had a significant level of international engagement from thousands of learners participating from across over 50 countries. The free short course offers a number of important tips, tools and approaches to equip academics and professionals with an understanding of the pedagogical foundations integral for the development and delivery of effective digital learning. Below is a short video trailer from the team discussing their collaborative work:

The team was awarded a good practice certificate by The Advancing Academic Development project group to recognise their work as finalists. To commemorate the occasion, Deputy Vice Chancellor Education, Liz Johnson hosted a small event at Deakin Downtown to present a reprise of Chie’s presentation, and to personally award the team with their certificates. See photos below.

Resources

Sign up here for the FutureLearn Transforming Digital Learning MOOC.

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“My opinion matters” – Students as Partners in Curriculum Design

“My opinion matters” – Students as Partners in Curriculum Design

“My opinion matters” – Students as Partners in Curriculum Design

02

DEC, 2019
Students as Partners
Teaching & Learning

Digital Innovation
Collaboration

Ever wonder what your unit would look like if students designed it?

That’s a pretty radical idea – staff expertise and guidance is essential to the learning experience. But it is possible to partner with students to co-create and co-design your curriculum – what might that look like?

In the CloudFirst CoDesign Project, we worked in partnership with Prakash Jha, a Master of Business Analytics student, to identify opportunities for student involvement in curriculum design. Using Deakin’s new Students as Partners framework we co-created the Student Participation Matrix to show how students can be involved as sounding-boards, influencers, decision-makers and co-creators.

Involving students can help you identify challenging areas, find new ways of presenting information or help develop a shared understanding of unit standards (which also develops students’ evaluative judgement!). For example, if students find it tricky to understand assessment requirements, you could partner with past students to redesign the assessment rubric, or create supporting resources – like this video by Law students Ruby Cordner and Brody Wons with Course Director, Sharon Erbacher.

If your students are from different disciplines, ask them to help you choose case studies relevant to their interests and career goals. Or start at the beginning, and bring a group of students together to find out what they thought worked really well, what was challenging and what could be done differently next time. 

Staff-student partnerships have benefits for both staff and students, including enhanced engagement, improved classroom experiences and assessment performance, a sense of belonging and trust, and enhanced relationships and wellbeing (Bovill, 2019). As Prakash explained:

“This collaborative approach helps both staff and students. While the academic team gets students’ perspective and feedback from their recent experiences, students too get some benefits such as feeling more invested in their education, taking responsibility for their learning and getting experience in co-creating the learning materials with staff.”

Prakash Jha – CloudFirst student partner

To find out more about how you could partner with students in curriculum design, contact us (d.taylor@deakin.edu.au or joanne.elliott@deakin.edu.au). As for the ‘why’, we’ll let Prakash have the last word!

“I have been learning through Cloud Deakin and classroom lectures, but this internship gave me opportunity to understand the effort and the process behind the unit design. Every day, I felt that as a student my opinion matters, and I felt important. In fact, I felt that I can bring a difference, a positive change by sharing my experience about my learning journey. And this is the best experience for me so far.”

Prakash Jha, CloudFirst student partner

*To support more staff to engage with student partners, Deakin has launched a SaP Community of Practice – contact Jo Cook to get involved. And keep an eye out for next year’s National Students as Partners Roundtable (28th August), hosted by Deakin, to share your experiences and learn from others.

Resources

Bovill, C. (2019). Student–staff partnerships in learning and teaching: an overview of current practice and discourse. Journal of Geography in Higher Education, 1-14. doi: 10.1080/03098265.2019.1660628

Deakin University. (2019). Deakin Students as Partners: A guide to enhancing the student voice across Deakin. Retrieved from here

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Harnessing Cultural Diversity – A FutureLearn Collaboration with Lee Martin and Kristen Richards

Harnessing Cultural Diversity – A FutureLearn Collaboration with Lee Martin and Kristen Richards

Harnessing Cultural Diversity – A FutureLearn Collaboration with Lee Martin & Kristen Richards
04
NOV, 2019
Teaching & Learning
Digital Innovation
Cultural Diversity
Collaboration
In partnership with FutureLearn, Deakin University has developed an online course highlighting the impact of cultural diversity in the workplace – examining the benefits and challenges that diversity brings to any team and business, and how to manage that. In an Australian business context this is particularly important given that the workforce is multicultural.

This course is also symbolic of the great collaborative work at Deakin. Harnessing Cultural Diversity has brought facilitators and contributors from across the university together to create a new course for a global cohort. Lee Martin, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Management in the Deakin Business School, and Kristen Richards, Senior Educational Developer in the Global Studio team, discuss working collaboratively to create the FutureLearn short course.

Lee: The course came about when Deakin applied for a competitive grant that FutureLearn was offering and I was brought in as a specialist to help develop the grant application, and then the course. I wanted to be involved because it seemed like a golden opportunity to:

a) develop a new course that was directly in my area of expertise and bring in the latest research ideas in that area;

b) gain experience and new skills in developing a MOOC, with the support of learning designers; and,

c) reach a wider (global!) audience and hopefully have a real impact on how people work in culturally diverse teams.

It was exciting to bring to life our vision for the course, as the team helped us to produce videos (animations, case studies and interviews). We were able to access all this extra support that you don’t usually have when designing a traditional course alone. Having said that, it was a lot of work as you have to rethink the way content is structured, delivered, and engaged with, but if you are passionate about the subject material it can be a lot of fun. Working closely with learning experts – Kristen, Harsh Suri, and Puva Arumugam – and the broader teaching and learning team who supported us, was one of the best collaborative work experiences I’ve had.

Above (in order): Lee Martin & Kristen Richards
Kristen: It was wonderful to work with a team who were so engaged in the whole process of designing and developing the course. I think that because everyone cared so much about the subject, and the potential impact of the course, it led to more active collaboration.

Designing courses for FutureLearn requires an openness to change. Especially when we’re developing MOOCs on an open platform, the accessibility of the content and how it’s delivered becomes more important than what we might normally be used to. So educators need to think more about how they deliver content to students online. Delivering resources of high academic integrity needs to be balanced with making sure the content is also catering to a diverse range of learners.

The course has done really well since launch, with over 1600 registrations, and 500 active students, 200 of who are engaging with each other as social learners.

Above-left: Lee interviewing Dr. Jeff Shao
Above-right: Team developing a video resource for the course
Lee: I think collaborating in a multicultural team helped us develop well-thought out course materials by considering the design from different perspectives. I think our team embodied the principles that we were trying to teach in the course. For example, I believe everyone felt respected, included and comfortable to offer their opinions and ideas, which ultimately leads to a better product. Given the course is about cultural diversity, it’s good for learners to see that the teaching team is also culturally diverse. We have had so much engagement and this is really affirming. The level of thoughtful conversation from students on FutureLearn has been great.

Kristen: I agree with Lee, the discussions we had during the design phase gave us more of an insight into how we needed to design the course to be more inclusive for a global cohort. We tried to develop content and tasks that diverse learners would be able to connect with and contribute to. It’s been interesting see that now play out in social learning aspects of the course; learners are genuinely benefiting from sharing their experiences.

I also really appreciated how stakeholders from the wider Deakin community were willing to review and give their feedback, which gave us more confidence about what we were producing.

Lee: Yes, absolutely. I think appreciating and respecting what everyone brings to the process is important, and when everyone who is involved is genuinely enthusiastic about what we are trying to achieve, the collaboration works really well and is a great learning experience.

Resources

For more on Harnessing Cultural Diversity visit the course page here.

For more on FutureLearn go to their homepage or contact globalstudio@deakin.edu.au

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A Students Perspective of Microsoft Teams with Joan Sutherland & Rahul Masakorala

A Students Perspective of Microsoft Teams with Joan Sutherland & Rahul Masakorala

A Student’s Perspective of Microsoft Teams with Joan Sutherland & Rahul Masakorala

04

NOV, 2019

Teaching & Learning
Good Practice
Digital Innovation
DLE3

Above: Joan Sutherland & Rahul Masakorala

Joan Sutherland, Senior Education Developer sits down with Deakin student Rahul Masakorala, to explore his perspective of Microsoft Teams – the good, the bad, and otherwise. 

Collaboration is a hot topic in digital learning, particularly how it can be effectively applied as a learning strategy and to engage students, many of whom arrive with advanced digital experience and expectations. At Deakin University, we aim to augment these experiences with platforms that are used in the relevant industries, so as to ensure our graduates are ready for their world of work.

 The School of IT have done exactly that by reviewing their collaboration projects, consulting with industry and implementing Microsoft Teams to facilitate this collaboration. Microsoft Teams is a ‘collaboration hub’ that operates in 44 languages and is currently used in over 500,000 organisations – including 91% of Fortune 100 companies. So, when the School of IT were sourcing a solution for their collaboration projects that mimicked the world of work, they implemented Microsoft Teams. 

Useful Resources

For more on potential tools in the DLE 3 Collaboration stream and microsoft teams please visit the Collaboration page (staff access).

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Inclusive Education the CloudFirst Way

Inclusive Education the CloudFirst Way

Inclusive Education the CloudFirst Way

01

NOV, 2019

Teaching & Learning
Good Practice
Inclusive Education
Digital Innovation
CloudFirst

 

Inclusivity is at the heart of Deakin’s values: we embrace difference and nurture a connected, safe and respectful community.1 Creating inclusive learning experiences for students is key, and the best way to achieve this is to consider inclusivity from the beginning of the design phase.  CloudFirst Learning Design offers one way to design for inclusivity. Deakin’s Inclusive Education Principles can be mapped to CloudFirst Learning Design, so staff are guided to consider key inclusivity elements from the start.

Many of the inclusive techniques used in CloudFirst Learning Design are simple and what we would expect of a ‘best practice’ design.

For example:

  • Clearly identify learning aims
  • Scaffold content, activities and assessments
  • Provide captions, transcripts and consistent heading levels
  • Design self-check opportunities complete with explanatory feedback
  • Build in opportunities for peer learning and social connections
  • Guide students through clearly-signposted learning pathways with study support resources embedded at key times.

Other creative techniques include, creating personas that represent the diversity of our student cohort, providing options in assessment tasks that give students genuine opportunities to demonstrate their learning in different ways, and representing content in multiple mediums such as imagery, video and audio.

Above: Inclusive Education Principles mapped against CloudFirst learning design.
These examples and other practical strategies were discussed at Deakin’s Inclusive Education Community of Practice August event, demonstrating that at Deakin, best practice is inclusive practice in learning design. You can view the presentation and other Inclusive Education resources at the CoP event page, or, if you would like to know more about CloudFirst Learning Design, please contact Darci Taylor.

1Deakin University. (2019). Values. Retrieved from: https://www.deakin.edu.au/about-deakin/values

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