AUSTRALIAN AWARDS FOR UNIVERSITY TEACHING

What are the Australian Awards for University Teaching (AAUT)?

Australian Awards for University Teaching recognise learning and teaching excellence at a national level.

  • Citations for Outstanding Contributions to Student Learning
  • Awards for Programs that Enhance Learning
  • Awards for Teaching Excellence
  • Award for Australian Teacher of the Year– (selected  from nominations in the other categories)
AAUT AT DEAKIN OVERVIEW

To be eligible to apply for an Australian Award for University Teaching you must first have received a Vice-Chancellor’s Learning Award and be invited to nominate from a pool which includes nominations from Associate Deans (Teaching and Learning), Heads of School, Directors of Divisions and other senior staff across the university.

HOW DO I APPLY?

Those wishing to apply for an Award for Programs that Enhance Learning are asked to contact the Learning Awards team at learning-awards@deakin.edu.au. Applicants will be supported with information sessions, a mentor to support them in developing their application and an internal review process.

 

EVENTS

2019 AAUT activities kicked off at Deakin with an information session for applicants and mentors on Thursday 20th June.  The session provided an overview of the awards process and tips for tailoring applications to awards criteria.  Resources from the session are available via the ‘Additional Resources’ tab below (Deakin sign-on required).

The Learning Awards Team will meet (on request) with interested applicants from mid-June to assist with award preparations.  Mentor sessions will also commence at this time.  Please contact the Learning Awards Team at learning-awards@deakin.edu.au with queries about upcoming activities.

The full list of upcoming awards activities:

JUN-JUL – Develop first draft with mentor

29th JUL – First draft due

2-9th AUG – Internal review process

12th AUG – University advises AAUT of nominees

16th AUG – Feedback returned

AUG – Address feedback with mentor

30th AUG – Final draft due

Jan 2020 – Notification of outcome.

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Nomination Information Pack

AAUT Information Session

More information on AAUT is available on the Australian Government AAUT website.

The Australian Awards for University Teaching (AAUT) were established in 1997 by the Australian Government to celebrate and reward excellence in university teaching. Since then, with an honour roll that includes many highly respected and celebrated members of the sector, the Australian Awards for University Teaching have become a valued form of recognition for university educators Australia wide. The Australian Awards for University Teaching recognise the impact that educators have on the learning and teaching experiences and outcomes of university students. They celebrate and reward programs practices that support students and enhance learning. They promote excellence in learning and teaching in all aspects of higher education. Award winners contribute to systemic change in learning and teaching through the ongoing sharing and dissemination of knowledge.

There are four Award types promoting and recognising excellence in learning and teaching.

Citations for
Outstanding Contributions
to Student Learning

Citations recognise and reward contributions made by individuals and teams to the quality of student learning. They are awarded to individuals or teams who have contributed to the quality of student learning over a sustained period, whether they are academic staff, general staff, sessional staff or institutional associates.

Awards for
Teaching Excellence
(Teaching Awards)

Awards for Teaching Excellence recognise Australia’s most outstanding university teachers or teaching teams who have demonstrated excellence, leadership and sustained commitment to teaching and learning in higher education.  Teaching Awards are given in seven discipline based categories.

Citations for
Outstanding Contributions
to Student Learning

Citations recognise and reward contributions made by individuals and teams to the quality of student learning. They are awarded to individuals or teams who have contributed to the quality of student learning over a sustained period, whether they are academic staff, general staff, sessional staff or institutional associates.

Awards for
Teaching Excellence
(Teaching Awards)

Awards for Teaching Excellence recognise Australia’s most outstanding university teachers or teaching teams who have demonstrated excellence, leadership and sustained commitment to teaching and learning in higher education. Teaching Awards are given in seven discipline based categories.

Award for
Australian University Teacher
of the Year

The Award for Australian University Teacher of the Year is the premier university teaching award. Among the Teaching Award recipients, one individual with an exceptional record of advancing student learning, educational leadership and scholarly contribution to learning and teaching will be awarded the Award for Australian University Teacher of the Year.

Awards for Programs
that Enhance Learning
(Program Awards)

Awards for Programs that Enhance Learning recognise learning and teaching support programs or services that make innovative and outstanding contributions to student learning and/or the quality of the student experience. One award is given each year in each of the following categories: Widening Participation, Educational Partnerships and Collaborations with other Organisations, Innovation in curriculum design and pedagogy practice, Postgraduate education, Student Experiences and Learning Support Services andGlobal citizenship and Internationalisation

Award for
Australian University Teacher
of the Year

The Award for Australian University Teacher of the Year is the premier university teaching award. Among the Teaching Award recipients, one individual with an exceptional record of advancing student learning, educational leadership and scholarly contribution to learning and teaching will be awarded the Award for Australian University Teacher of the Year.

Awards for Programs
that Enhance Learning
(Program Awards)

Awards for Programs that Enhance Learning recognise learning and teaching support programs or services that make innovative and outstanding contributions to student learning and/or the quality of the student experience. One award is given each year in each of the following categories: Widening Participation, Educational Partnerships and Collaborations with other Organisations, Innovation in curriculum design and pedagogy practice, Postgraduate education, Student Experiences and Learning Support Services andGlobal citizenship and Internationalisation

2018

Associate Professor Kelly Miller

  • For the development of an innovative Work Integrated Learning micro-credential in environmental sustainability as part of a coherent and constructively aligned WIL curriculum.

Occupational Therapy Simulations for Learning Team: Ms Kelli Nicola-Richmond, Ms Valerie Watchorn, Mr Peter Lane and Mr Anthony Neylan

  • For sustained excellence in the development and application of an innovative, high-quality, authentic learning resource that enhances the clinical skills of occupational therapy students.

FXAP (Foreign Exchange Authentic Practice) Team: Associate Professor Victor Fang, Dr Sohel Azad, Dr Vincent Xiang and Dr Sharon Pittaway

  • For sustained authentic, experiential learning experiences that motivate and inspire finance students to learn in an innovative learning and teaching space.
2017
Dr Richie Barker

 

For excellence in developing innovative curricula that enhances the employability of public relations students by bringing current, authentic industry projects and practitioners into learning environments.

2016

Deakin Interprofessional Education Team: Mrs Sherryn Evans, Mrs Catherine Ward and Ms Nicole Shaw

For developing, implementing and sustaining a globally unique, wholly online, interprofessional education unit for students from seven different health professions.

Dr Glenn Wadley

For leadership in implementing a suite of innovative active-learning approaches that have enhanced student learning in undergraduate physiology and in Honours research training.

2015

Ms Norma Barrett

For excellence in developing coherent and imaginative digital learning resources that transform how students critically assess and interpret information and statistics

Deakin Psychiatric Simulation Program: Dr Jade Sheen, Dr Clint Gurtman and Professor Jane McGillivray

For the establishment of a program that uses simulation-based teaching and authentic assessment methods to enhance mental health education

2014

First Year Psychology at Deakin Team: Ms Hannah Bereznicki, Ms Sharon Horwood and Dr Wendy Sutherland-Smith

For excellence in developing a suite of innovative and dynamic assessment strategies that fosters independent learning among large cohorts of first-year psychology students.

Dr Chad Whelan

For excellence and leadership in developing curricula and resources encompassing authentic and innovative learning environments that significantly enhance the learning and employability of criminology students.

Mr Timothy Wilkin

For the creation of innovative computer-based experiential learning environments that support and motivate the development of independent learning behaviours in information technology students.

2013

Miss Kristy Hess

For excellence in advancing news reporting practices among rural and regional journalism students through innovative, research-led curriculum and professional expertise

Dr Bodil Rasmussen

For sustained leadership in developing innovative courses in partnership with local, national and international educational and professional organisations

Mr Michael Volkov

For creating inclusive student-centred, engaging learning environments shaped by teaching scholarship that inspires students to develop real world employability skills in marketing

Mr Jason Wells

For enhancing the on and off campus first year student learning experience through innovative blended and personalised teaching approaches in the field of information technology

2012

Dr Jaclyn Broadbent

  • For the sustained creation of motivating and inspiring learning environments for over 1600 students in a compulsory, multi-modal subject

Associate Professor Julie Considine

  • For commitment to a teaching-evidence-practice nexus in specialist and advanced nursing courses to develop clinical excellence and enhanced quality and safety of healthcare

Dr Tony Joel

  • For creating challenging learning environments that motivate and inspire history students to explore how the past continues to shape the world in which we live

Ms Bronwyn Kirby

  • For authentic teaching strategies that engage and prepare students to transition with confidence from the public relations classroom to the professional workplace

Dr Tess Knight

  • For empowering self-reflective and independent learning: informing perspectival appreciations on ageing, and future counselling roles

Dr Lynn Riddell

  • For leadership that has made a sustained positive contribution to developing professional competencies and advancing career outcomes for students in food and nutrition 2013

Dr Michael Weston

  • For sustained excellence in experiential science teaching and fostering a 'community of learners' engaged in a highly successful, vibrant and growing undergraduate degree course

2017

Social and Behavioural Sciences,

Deakin Psychology Simulation Team, Dr Jade Sheen, Associate Professor Wendy Sutherland-Smith and Professor Jane McGillivray

The Deakin Psychology Simulation Team addresses the issue of translating theory into practice through the development and systematic integration of simulation-based education within postgraduate professional psychology courses. Simulation-based education allows students to engage in simulated workplace learning opportunities that are both authentic and proximal to their workplace environments. Students observe clinical staff undertaking practice; engage with real-world case studies; practice clinical skills with live simulated patients; and undertake authentic workplace related assessments of learned skills.

The simulation-based education program, used effectively over six years, is unique within the psychology discipline, offering an unparalleled depth and breadth of simulation-based learning opportunities for students.

 

2016

Humanities and the Arts

Dr Tony Joel

Dr Tony Joel motivates and inspires history students to develop their knowledge and understanding of how the past continues to shape the world in which we live, through a rich blend of authentic learning activities. He arranges imaginative and engaging learning opportunities that invite students to engage with the ‘living past’, through site visits, video and online learning environments.

Dr Joel draws on his discipline expertise, international field research and advanced interactive media strategies to build curricula and resources that foster enquiry-based learning. His inventive assessments encourage students to learn and apply transferable skills directly linked to the university’s designated graduate learning outcomes.

Dr Joel has represented Deakin University in national projects and through leadership roles as Associate head of School for Teaching and Learning. As Course Director of the Bachelor of Arts, he has also made a significant positive impact on student learning experiences and outcomes, with broad reach beyond his discipline.

Social and Behavioural Sciences,

Dr Jaclyn Broadbent

Dr Jaclyn Broadbent is recognised nationally and internationally in psychology and health behaviour education, and for her sustained and innovative leadership in delivering engaging, accessible and authentic curricula to students in very large first year classes. She has championed student feedback and motivational strategies that foster student engagement. Dr Broadbent’s expertise has been recognised beyond Deakin University, with her approaches adopted by tertiary institutions across Australia.

Instead of focusing on one or two aspects of a program, such as better assessment strategies or the use of simulations, Dr Broadbent’s approach looks at every aspect of her practice. This includes the desired learning outcomes, the learning styles and needs of students, the content, the delivery mechanisms, the administration and the development of the teaching staff. This comprehensive approach allows her to identify strategies to improve student learning outcomes that are truly multidimensional. Dr Broadbent shares her practice widely so that the benefits she creates for her students and staff become available to others.

2015

Biological Sciences, Health and Related Studies

Dr Mike Weston

Through his teaching Dr Mike Weston brings to life his favourite ancient Chinese proverb

“tell me- I forget
show me - I remember
involve me – I understand”

A true champion of immersion, experiential learning, Dr Weston’s favourite classroom for his students is the “classroom without walls”. Intensive field trips are a core component of his wildlife and conservation biology courses, where students get to experience first-hand working with wildlife and the natural environments they live in.

Social and Behavioural Sciences,

Dr Gery Karantzas

Over recent years Dr Karantzas has developed a reputation as a national leader in teaching and learning. One significant contribution has been the development of Collaborative Problem Based Learning approach for psychology teaching. This approach is based on research on how individuals socially construct knowledge through integrating the perspectives and understandings of others.

Dr Karantzas approach has had a national impact in a relatively short period of time, including its uptake by ten psychology departments in Australian universities as well as attracting international attention.

 

2014

Physical Sciences and Related Studies

Associate Professor Kieran Lim

For Associate Professor Kieran Lim, everything is chemistry and chemistry is everything. He uses toys, songs and analogies to help overcome students' fear of chemistry and to help motivate and inspire students to learn. Examples from everyday life illustrate chemistry concepts and make the subject relevant for students. He has been a member of national projects that have improved learning in both large classes and in laboratories. His innovative uses of videoconferencing, spread sheets and online quizzes have enhanced learning and are cited as exemplars of how technology can improve engagement and learning. Since the foundations of university education begin at school level, Kieran's accomplishments also extend to outreach activities for school students, and to professional development for their teachers, especially around the senior high school-university transition. He has been involved in the development of the school level Australian Science Curriculum and in the university level Academic Standards: Threshold Learning Outcomes for Chemistry. His developments and learning resources have been shared with colleagues and the wider academic community through refereed teaching and learning publications, invited conference presentations, and other media, and have been implemented in universities and schools in Australia, North America, UK, New Zealand and Asia.

2013

Biological Sciences, Health and Related Studies

Ms Helen Larkin

Helen Larkin is a leader in providing authentic, creative and inter-professional learning opportunities not only for occupational therapy students, but beyond her own discipline to other health disciplines and more broadly.

By combining theory, concept, practice, reflection and improvement in an ongoing process, Helen ensures the highest quality of learning, engagement and experience for her students. Through the research and application of learning theory to her teaching, Helen has developed innovative practice-based curricula delivered in high support/high challenge classroom and online learning environments. Helen initiated and led a world first, inter-professional education initiative between occupational therapy and architecture students which continue to build the capacity of graduates to work in the newer and emerging areas of universal design practice.